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Article: Environmental planning, biodiversity and the development process: the case of Hong Kong's Chinese white dolphins

TitleEnvironmental planning, biodiversity and the development process: the case of Hong Kong's Chinese white dolphins
Authors
KeywordsChinese white dolphins (Sousa chinensis)
Hong Kong
Environmental policy
EIA
Airport development
Issue Date1997
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jenvman
Citation
Journal of Environmental Management, 1997, v. 50, p. 351-367 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong has enjoyed more than 20 years of almost uninterrupted economic growth and the territory is widely recognized as one of the most successful of the newly industrializing economies. Economic success has, however, brought with it a variety of environmental problems including deterioration of air and water bodies and the loss of terrestrial and marine habitats. Environmental degradation also poses a serious threat to local biodiversity. Despite its stated commitment to environmental protection, the Hong Kong Government is still strongly growth-oriented and the territory's environmental institutions and policies often seem ineffective in resolving the conflicts that arise between development and the environment. To illustrate some of the contradictions inherent in Hong Kong's current approach to environmental and conservation issues, this paper focuses on the controversy surrounding the fate of the local population of the Indo-Pacific humped-back dolphin, or, as it is locally known, the Chinese white dolphin (Sousa chinensis). The dolphin's habitat has been disrupted by major development projects, marine pollution and fishing and shipping activity. It is possible that the species will be extinct in Hong Kong waters by the beginning of the next century. The paper examines the background to the controversy that has arisen surrounding the future of the dolphins and evaluates the Government's attempts to develop a conservation strategy to protect them. The preferred option—the creation of a dolphin sanctuary within a designated marine park area—has been strongly criticized by some local marine biologists and conservationists as being inadequate and inappropriate. The failure to address effectively the problems faced by the Chinese white dolphin may be attributed to the lack of an overall conservation strategy in Hong Kong, shortcomings in the territory's environmental impact assessment system and limited local scientific knowledge concerning the dolphin population.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89844
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.131
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.206
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHills, PRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T10:02:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T10:02:30Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Environmental Management, 1997, v. 50, p. 351-367en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0301-4797en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89844-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong has enjoyed more than 20 years of almost uninterrupted economic growth and the territory is widely recognized as one of the most successful of the newly industrializing economies. Economic success has, however, brought with it a variety of environmental problems including deterioration of air and water bodies and the loss of terrestrial and marine habitats. Environmental degradation also poses a serious threat to local biodiversity. Despite its stated commitment to environmental protection, the Hong Kong Government is still strongly growth-oriented and the territory's environmental institutions and policies often seem ineffective in resolving the conflicts that arise between development and the environment. To illustrate some of the contradictions inherent in Hong Kong's current approach to environmental and conservation issues, this paper focuses on the controversy surrounding the fate of the local population of the Indo-Pacific humped-back dolphin, or, as it is locally known, the Chinese white dolphin (Sousa chinensis). The dolphin's habitat has been disrupted by major development projects, marine pollution and fishing and shipping activity. It is possible that the species will be extinct in Hong Kong waters by the beginning of the next century. The paper examines the background to the controversy that has arisen surrounding the future of the dolphins and evaluates the Government's attempts to develop a conservation strategy to protect them. The preferred option—the creation of a dolphin sanctuary within a designated marine park area—has been strongly criticized by some local marine biologists and conservationists as being inadequate and inappropriate. The failure to address effectively the problems faced by the Chinese white dolphin may be attributed to the lack of an overall conservation strategy in Hong Kong, shortcomings in the territory's environmental impact assessment system and limited local scientific knowledge concerning the dolphin population.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jenvmanen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Environmental Managementen_HK
dc.subjectChinese white dolphins (Sousa chinensis)-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectEnvironmental policy-
dc.subjectEIA-
dc.subjectAirport development-
dc.titleEnvironmental planning, biodiversity and the development process: the case of Hong Kong's Chinese white dolphinsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0301-4797&volume=50&spage=351&epage=367&date=1997&atitle=Environmental+planning,+biodiversity+and+the+development+process:+the+case+of+Hong+Kong%27s+Chinese+white+dolphinsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHills, PR: phills@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHills, PR=rp00858en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1006/jema.1997.0130-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031215126-
dc.identifier.hkuros32249en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997XQ78500002-

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