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Article: High-rise living in Singapore public housing
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TitleHigh-rise living in Singapore public housing
 
AuthorsYuen, B3
Yeh, A2
Appold, SJ4
Earl, G5
Ting, J1
Kwee, LK3
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/
 
CitationUrban Studies, 2006, v. 43 n. 3, p. 583-600 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00420980500533133
 
AbstractIn recent years, amid the debates of sustainable development and urban compactness, there has been a widening interest to reintroduce high-rise living in cities. Several European cities including London and Manchester are once again building high-rise housing as part of their urban housing strategy. Elsewhere, in Asia, Hong Kong and Singapore are distinguished by their high-rise public housing developments. With nearly half of the world's population living in urban areas, the unfolding trend is towards a more urban-style development with taller buildings included as an inevitable housing solution. Drawing on findings from a study of Singapore public housing residents' living experience, this paper aims to look at the increasingly important question of the liveability of high-rise living by discussing the occupants' appreciation and concerns of high-rise. © 2006 The Editors of Urban Studies.
 
ISSN0042-0980
2013 Impact Factor: 1.330
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00420980500533133
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000235534300006
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorYuen, B
 
dc.contributor.authorYeh, A
 
dc.contributor.authorAppold, SJ
 
dc.contributor.authorEarl, G
 
dc.contributor.authorTing, J
 
dc.contributor.authorKwee, LK
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T10:02:08Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T10:02:08Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, amid the debates of sustainable development and urban compactness, there has been a widening interest to reintroduce high-rise living in cities. Several European cities including London and Manchester are once again building high-rise housing as part of their urban housing strategy. Elsewhere, in Asia, Hong Kong and Singapore are distinguished by their high-rise public housing developments. With nearly half of the world's population living in urban areas, the unfolding trend is towards a more urban-style development with taller buildings included as an inevitable housing solution. Drawing on findings from a study of Singapore public housing residents' living experience, this paper aims to look at the increasingly important question of the liveability of high-rise living by discussing the occupants' appreciation and concerns of high-rise. © 2006 The Editors of Urban Studies.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationUrban Studies, 2006, v. 43 n. 3, p. 583-600 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00420980500533133
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00420980500533133
 
dc.identifier.epage600
 
dc.identifier.hkuros117637
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000235534300006
 
dc.identifier.issn0042-0980
2013 Impact Factor: 1.330
 
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dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89814
 
dc.identifier.volume43
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Studies
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleHigh-rise living in Singapore public housing
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Singapore Institute of Architects
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. National University of Singapore
  4. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  5. University of New South Wales