File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The relationship between administrative hierarchy position and city size development in China

TitleThe relationship between administrative hierarchy position and city size development in China
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0343-2521
Citation
Geojournal, 2002, v. 56 n. 2, p. 97-112 How to Cite?
AbstractChina's urbanization process in the past 20 years has drawn much academic attention, and as a result, many attempts to explain the uniqueness of China's urbanization have emerged. Some argued that Tolley's model (1987), the well known theory explaining global urbanization, or the 'Murray-Szelenyi' thesis (1984), which focus on the investigation of urbanization in socialist countries, can be applied in China. Most western literature, however, claimed either a 'rural-bias' or an 'urban-bias' from the state took place in China's urbanization process. This paper suggests another perspective in the analysis of this process, as it argues that it was the state bias for the allocation of production and human resources in the cities of higher hierarchical ranking that is behind China's urbanization. The objective of the paper is to test it through two hypotheses. The first hypothesis suggests that the higher the city is in the urban hierarchy, the more population it has; and the second argues the higher administrative position a city has, the better Social and economic performance it will show. Using statistical data to validate these two hypotheses, this paper attempts to justify the role of 'state-bias' of resources allocation and the dominance of the administrative hierarchy in China's urbanization process. Lastly, the paper argues, the state itself is a major factor or source for China's urbanization development.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89694
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.516
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, RCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhao, XBen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T10:00:38Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T10:00:38Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGeojournal, 2002, v. 56 n. 2, p. 97-112en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0343-2521en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89694-
dc.description.abstractChina's urbanization process in the past 20 years has drawn much academic attention, and as a result, many attempts to explain the uniqueness of China's urbanization have emerged. Some argued that Tolley's model (1987), the well known theory explaining global urbanization, or the 'Murray-Szelenyi' thesis (1984), which focus on the investigation of urbanization in socialist countries, can be applied in China. Most western literature, however, claimed either a 'rural-bias' or an 'urban-bias' from the state took place in China's urbanization process. This paper suggests another perspective in the analysis of this process, as it argues that it was the state bias for the allocation of production and human resources in the cities of higher hierarchical ranking that is behind China's urbanization. The objective of the paper is to test it through two hypotheses. The first hypothesis suggests that the higher the city is in the urban hierarchy, the more population it has; and the second argues the higher administrative position a city has, the better Social and economic performance it will show. Using statistical data to validate these two hypotheses, this paper attempts to justify the role of 'state-bias' of resources allocation and the dominance of the administrative hierarchy in China's urbanization process. Lastly, the paper argues, the state itself is a major factor or source for China's urbanization development.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0343-2521en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGeoJournalen_HK
dc.titleThe relationship between administrative hierarchy position and city size development in Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0343-2521&volume=56&issue=2&spage=97&epage=112&date=2002&atitle=The+Relationship+between+Administrative+Hierarchy+Position+and+City+Size+Development+in+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, RCK: hrxucck@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhao, XB: sxzhao@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, RCK=rp00992en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhao, XB=rp00597en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1022463615129en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036933248en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros78339en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036933248&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume56en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage97en_HK
dc.identifier.epage112en_HK
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, RCK=26643459800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, XB=7403577707en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats