File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Reading-related cognitive deficits in developmental dyslexia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and developmental coordination disorder among Chinese children

TitleReading-related cognitive deficits in developmental dyslexia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and developmental coordination disorder among Chinese children
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherInternational Reading Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.reading.org/General/Publications/Journals/RRQ.aspx
Citation
Reading Research Quarterly, 2005, v. 40 n. 3, p. 318-337 How to Cite?
AbstractMOST PAST research findings suggest that phonological deficit is unique to developmental dyslexia insofar as alphabetic languages are concerned. The present study investigated the existence of any similar unique reading-related cognitive deficits associated with developmental dyslexia in a nonalphabetic script, Chinese. The pattern of comorbidity among various developmental disorders was also examined. One hundred six Chinese children with different types of developmental disorders or learning difficulties, including developmental dyslexia (DYS), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), developmental coordination disorder (DCD), and borderline intelligence (BI) were tested on literacy, rapid-naming, phonological, orthographic, and visual processing skills. It was found that (a) the comorbidiry rates among these developmental disorders were high; (b) the DYS-only group was most impaired in rapid naming and orthographic processing and performed significantly worse than other "pure" groups; (c) the ADHD-only and DCD-only groups performed very closely to the average normal range in literacy and cognitive domains; and (d) the cognitive profile of the DYS+ADHD group resembled that of the DYS-only group, while that of the DYS+DCD group resembled some characteristics of both the "pure" groups. The authors conclude that rapid-naming deficit and orthographic deficit are unique marker deficits of developmental dyslexia in Chinese, while children with ADHD or DCD are less impaired in literacy and reading-related cognitive areas. Implications for educational and clinical practices are also discussed. © 2005 International Reading Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89576
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.087
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.768
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, CSHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, DWOen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, PWLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsang, SMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:58:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:58:47Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationReading Research Quarterly, 2005, v. 40 n. 3, p. 318-337en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0034-0553en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89576-
dc.description.abstractMOST PAST research findings suggest that phonological deficit is unique to developmental dyslexia insofar as alphabetic languages are concerned. The present study investigated the existence of any similar unique reading-related cognitive deficits associated with developmental dyslexia in a nonalphabetic script, Chinese. The pattern of comorbidity among various developmental disorders was also examined. One hundred six Chinese children with different types of developmental disorders or learning difficulties, including developmental dyslexia (DYS), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), developmental coordination disorder (DCD), and borderline intelligence (BI) were tested on literacy, rapid-naming, phonological, orthographic, and visual processing skills. It was found that (a) the comorbidiry rates among these developmental disorders were high; (b) the DYS-only group was most impaired in rapid naming and orthographic processing and performed significantly worse than other "pure" groups; (c) the ADHD-only and DCD-only groups performed very closely to the average normal range in literacy and cognitive domains; and (d) the cognitive profile of the DYS+ADHD group resembled that of the DYS-only group, while that of the DYS+DCD group resembled some characteristics of both the "pure" groups. The authors conclude that rapid-naming deficit and orthographic deficit are unique marker deficits of developmental dyslexia in Chinese, while children with ADHD or DCD are less impaired in literacy and reading-related cognitive areas. Implications for educational and clinical practices are also discussed. © 2005 International Reading Association.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInternational Reading Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.reading.org/General/Publications/Journals/RRQ.aspxen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofReading Research Quarterlyen_HK
dc.titleReading-related cognitive deficits in developmental dyslexia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and developmental coordination disorder among Chinese childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0034-0553&volume=40&spage=318&epage=337&date=2005&atitle=Reading-related+cognitive+deficits+in+developmental+dyslexia,+attention-deficit/hyperactivity+disorder,+and+developmental+coordination+disorder+among+Chinese+childrenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, CSH:shhoc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, CSH=rp00631en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1598/RRQ.40.3.2en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-24944538304en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros111466en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-24944538304&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage318en_HK
dc.identifier.epage337en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000230824100002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, CSH=35095289900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, DWO=7402216598en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, PWL=7401748962en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SH=7601392012en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, SM=7102255956en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats