File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: A longitudinal study of maternal messages about dating and sexuality and their influence on Latino adolescents

TitleA longitudinal study of maternal messages about dating and sexuality and their influence on Latino adolescents
Authors
KeywordsGender differences
Latinos
Observational methodology
Parent-adolescent communication
Sexuality communication
Issue Date2002
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jadohea
Citation
Journal Of Adolescent Health, 2002, v. 31 n. 1, p. 59-69 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To learn more about the nature of mother-adolescent discussions about sexuality and their influence on adolescents' behaviors and attitudes in Latino families. Methods: Fifty-five Latino mothers and their midadolescent children (35 girls, 20 boys, mean age 13 years) were observed talking about dating and sexuality. The videotaped conversations were coded for the prevalence of five maternal message types: beliefs and values, advice, cautionary messages, comments about the adolescents' everyday experiences, and maternal self-disclosure about her own dating and sexuality experiences. A structural equation model was used to examined how time spent on the various message types was related to three adolescent-related outcomes collected about 1 year later: sexual behavior, attitudes toward premarital sex, and reports of openness in the mother-child relationship. Results: Latino mothers focused the conversation on their personal beliefs and values about dating and sexuality. Discussions about beliefs and values were accompanied by more parental advice and cautionary messages. More maternal self-disclosure about personal dating and sexuality experiences was related to the adolescents' reporting a better functioning relationship with their mothers and having more conservative attitudes toward premarital sex. Sexuality communication was both positively and negatively related to adolescent sexual behavior, but the messages were not the same. Conclusions: Maternal communication in Latino families influences adolescents' behaviors and attitudes toward sex and adolescents' perceptions of openness in the mother-child relationship. Observational methods are useful for studying the complexity of the communication process and for studying participants from ethnic minority populations who may be unfamiliar with or uncomfortable filling out questionnaires. © Society for Adolescent Medicine, 2002.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89547
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.838
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.910
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRomo, LFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLefkowitz, ESen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSigman, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorAu, TKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:58:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:58:25Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Adolescent Health, 2002, v. 31 n. 1, p. 59-69en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1054-139Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89547-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To learn more about the nature of mother-adolescent discussions about sexuality and their influence on adolescents' behaviors and attitudes in Latino families. Methods: Fifty-five Latino mothers and their midadolescent children (35 girls, 20 boys, mean age 13 years) were observed talking about dating and sexuality. The videotaped conversations were coded for the prevalence of five maternal message types: beliefs and values, advice, cautionary messages, comments about the adolescents' everyday experiences, and maternal self-disclosure about her own dating and sexuality experiences. A structural equation model was used to examined how time spent on the various message types was related to three adolescent-related outcomes collected about 1 year later: sexual behavior, attitudes toward premarital sex, and reports of openness in the mother-child relationship. Results: Latino mothers focused the conversation on their personal beliefs and values about dating and sexuality. Discussions about beliefs and values were accompanied by more parental advice and cautionary messages. More maternal self-disclosure about personal dating and sexuality experiences was related to the adolescents' reporting a better functioning relationship with their mothers and having more conservative attitudes toward premarital sex. Sexuality communication was both positively and negatively related to adolescent sexual behavior, but the messages were not the same. Conclusions: Maternal communication in Latino families influences adolescents' behaviors and attitudes toward sex and adolescents' perceptions of openness in the mother-child relationship. Observational methods are useful for studying the complexity of the communication process and for studying participants from ethnic minority populations who may be unfamiliar with or uncomfortable filling out questionnaires. © Society for Adolescent Medicine, 2002.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jadoheaen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Adolescent Healthen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Adolescent Health. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectGender differencesen_HK
dc.subjectLatinosen_HK
dc.subjectObservational methodologyen_HK
dc.subjectParent-adolescent communicationen_HK
dc.subjectSexuality communicationen_HK
dc.titleA longitudinal study of maternal messages about dating and sexuality and their influence on Latino adolescentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1054-139X&volume=31&spage=59&epage=69&date=2002&atitle=A+longitudinal+study+of+maternal+messages+about+dating+and+sexuality+and+their+influence+on+Latino+adolescents.+en_HK
dc.identifier.emailAu, TK:terryau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAu, TK=rp00580en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1054-139X(01)00402-5en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12090966-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036092601en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros79956en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036092601&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume31en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage59en_HK
dc.identifier.epage69en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000176627100012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRomo, LF=6701553532en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLefkowitz, ES=35614178400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSigman, M=7102195970en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu, TK=9435174900en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats