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Article: Aging effect on face recogntion

TitleAging effect on face recogntion
Authors
KeywordsAging/psychology
Face
Memory
Mental recall
Pattern
Issue Date2007
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkag.org/Publications/AJGG/Publications_AJGG.htm
Citation
Asian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2007, v. 2 n. 2, p. 93-98 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives. To examine the differences in face memory between young and older adults. Methods. The 46 healthy participants, 23 young (mean age, 21.8; standard deviation, 0.4 years) and 23 older (mean age, 66.4; standard deviation, 3.7 years) adults volunteered for this study. They were asked to learn and recognise unfamiliar faces in three recognition trials: after a single exposure, after four exposures, and after a half-hour delay. Results. The findings indicated non-significant differences in recognition accuracy (p>0.05), though the performance of the young adults was superior. However, for reaction time, there was a significant group and condition interaction (p=0.02). Conclusions. Compared to young adults, older adults may use a different processing route during face recognition in order to compensate for the decline in their cognitive abilities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89460
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.116

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, KYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHon, KYLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:57:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:57:18Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAsian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2007, v. 2 n. 2, p. 93-98en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1819-1576-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89460-
dc.description.abstractObjectives. To examine the differences in face memory between young and older adults. Methods. The 46 healthy participants, 23 young (mean age, 21.8; standard deviation, 0.4 years) and 23 older (mean age, 66.4; standard deviation, 3.7 years) adults volunteered for this study. They were asked to learn and recognise unfamiliar faces in three recognition trials: after a single exposure, after four exposures, and after a half-hour delay. Results. The findings indicated non-significant differences in recognition accuracy (p>0.05), though the performance of the young adults was superior. However, for reaction time, there was a significant group and condition interaction (p=0.02). Conclusions. Compared to young adults, older adults may use a different processing route during face recognition in order to compensate for the decline in their cognitive abilities.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkag.org/Publications/AJGG/Publications_AJGG.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatricsen_HK
dc.rightsAsian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.subjectAging/psychology-
dc.subjectFace-
dc.subjectMemory-
dc.subjectMental recall-
dc.subjectPattern-
dc.titleAging effect on face recogntionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros146367en_HK
dc.identifier.volume2-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage93-
dc.identifier.epage98-

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