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Article: Attentional bias towards negative affect stimuli and reactive aggression in male batterers

TitleAttentional bias towards negative affect stimuli and reactive aggression in male batterers
Authors
KeywordsAggression
Batterers
Domestic violence
Emotion
Neurocognitive abnormality
Threat
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychres
Citation
Psychiatry Research, 2010, v. 176 n. 2-3, p. 246-249 How to Cite?
AbstractSpouse abuse is listed as a V code in DSM-IV-TR and worthy of further clinical investigation, although research has focused predominantly on the victims of family violence rather than the batterers themselves. This study tests the hypotheses that (a) batterers have a neurocognitive bias favoring negative affect (aggressive) stimuli and (b) batterers are more characterized by reactive than proactive aggression. Tasks were administered to 23 male batterers and 24 controls to assess attentional bias to both negative affect stimuli (emotional Stroop) and affectively neutral stimuli (cognitive Stroop). Batterers relative to controls showed longer reaction times in naming the color of negative affect words than affectively neutral words. No such abnormality was observed for the non-affective cognitive control task. Results remained significant after controlling for comorbid depression. Batterers scored significantly higher on reactive (but not proactive) aggression. Results suggest that batterers may have a bias in allocating more attentional resources to aggressive words, potentially making them over-sensitive to negative affect stimuli in the environment. Future treatment programs addressing this neurocognitive abnormality may be more successful in reducing spouse abuse. © 2009.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89372
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.466
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.235
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grant Council of Hong Kong
Hong Kong Psychological Society (Division of Clinical Psychology)
National Natural Science Foundation of China30828012
Social Welfare Department, the Government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China
Funding Information:

The project was supported by General Research Fund of the Research Grant Council of Hong Kong, the Project Fund of Hong Kong Psychological Society (Division of Clinical Psychology), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30828012). The authors are indebted to the assistance and support from the Social Welfare Department, the Government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, SCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRaine, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:56:10Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:56:10Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychiatry Research, 2010, v. 176 n. 2-3, p. 246-249en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0165-1781en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89372-
dc.description.abstractSpouse abuse is listed as a V code in DSM-IV-TR and worthy of further clinical investigation, although research has focused predominantly on the victims of family violence rather than the batterers themselves. This study tests the hypotheses that (a) batterers have a neurocognitive bias favoring negative affect (aggressive) stimuli and (b) batterers are more characterized by reactive than proactive aggression. Tasks were administered to 23 male batterers and 24 controls to assess attentional bias to both negative affect stimuli (emotional Stroop) and affectively neutral stimuli (cognitive Stroop). Batterers relative to controls showed longer reaction times in naming the color of negative affect words than affectively neutral words. No such abnormality was observed for the non-affective cognitive control task. Results remained significant after controlling for comorbid depression. Batterers scored significantly higher on reactive (but not proactive) aggression. Results suggest that batterers may have a bias in allocating more attentional resources to aggressive words, potentially making them over-sensitive to negative affect stimuli in the environment. Future treatment programs addressing this neurocognitive abnormality may be more successful in reducing spouse abuse. © 2009.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychiatry Researchen_HK
dc.subjectAggressionen_HK
dc.subjectBatterersen_HK
dc.subjectDomestic violenceen_HK
dc.subjectEmotionen_HK
dc.subjectNeurocognitive abnormalityen_HK
dc.subjectThreaten_HK
dc.subject.meshAggression-
dc.subject.meshAttention - physiology-
dc.subject.meshBias (Epidemiology)-
dc.subject.meshConflict (Psychology)-
dc.subject.meshEmotions - physiology-
dc.titleAttentional bias towards negative affect stimuli and reactive aggression in male batterersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0165-1781&volume=176&issue=2-3&spage=246&epage=249&date=2010&atitle=Attentional+bias+towards+negative+affect+stimuli+and+reactive+aggression+in+male+batterersen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC:tmclee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychres.2008.12.013en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20207010-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77949772736en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros169538en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77949772736&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume176en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2-3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage246en_HK
dc.identifier.epage249en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276830000027-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SC=24781803800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRaine, A=7102893592en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, TMC=7501437381en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6835952-

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