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Article: Bingham Dai, Adolf Storfer, and the tentative beginnings of psychoanalytic culture in China, 1935-1941.

TitleBingham Dai, Adolf Storfer, and the tentative beginnings of psychoanalytic culture in China, 1935-1941.
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherEdinburgh University Press.
Citation
Psychoanalysis And History, 2004, v. 6 n. 1, p. 93-105 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper looks at the work of two figures who, while marginal to theoretical developments within the history of psychoanalysis, each briefly played an important role in the dissemination of analytical ideas in China, contributing to an early psychoanalytic culture there. Bingham Dai, a native of China, while studying for a PhD in sociology at Chicago, received instruction from Harry Stack Sullivan and a psychoanalytic training under Karen Horney's supervision. However, the neo-Freudian outlook with which this experience imbued him had its roots in an earlier encounter with his experiments in personality education first conducted on students in a Tientsin high school, and later in Shantung under the direction of the conservative Confucian scholar and reformer, Liang Shu Ming. These experiences convinced him that a less orthodox psychoanalytic perspective was what Chinese patients with psychological problems required. He returned in 1935 to teach medical psychology to doctors at Peking Union Medical College, taking a few into analysis and treating some patients. However, the Sino-Japanese war brought these activities to a close and he left in 1939, just a few months after the former Freud publisher and Viennese émigré, Adolf Storfer, arrived. Storfer set about publishing "Gelbe Post," a German language periodical replete with articles on psychoanalysis, linguistics and Chinese culture. But limited finances, severe competition from a rival publisher, plus his own ill health, forced him to abandon this in spite of the support offered him through the many contributors in the international psychoanalytic community whose articles he published. The paper concludes by considering the relative historiographic fate of the men upon whom subsequent scholarship has been very unevenly focused.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89368
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.312
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.151

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBlowers, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:56:07Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:56:07Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychoanalysis And History, 2004, v. 6 n. 1, p. 93-105en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1460-8235en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89368-
dc.description.abstractThis paper looks at the work of two figures who, while marginal to theoretical developments within the history of psychoanalysis, each briefly played an important role in the dissemination of analytical ideas in China, contributing to an early psychoanalytic culture there. Bingham Dai, a native of China, while studying for a PhD in sociology at Chicago, received instruction from Harry Stack Sullivan and a psychoanalytic training under Karen Horney's supervision. However, the neo-Freudian outlook with which this experience imbued him had its roots in an earlier encounter with his experiments in personality education first conducted on students in a Tientsin high school, and later in Shantung under the direction of the conservative Confucian scholar and reformer, Liang Shu Ming. These experiences convinced him that a less orthodox psychoanalytic perspective was what Chinese patients with psychological problems required. He returned in 1935 to teach medical psychology to doctors at Peking Union Medical College, taking a few into analysis and treating some patients. However, the Sino-Japanese war brought these activities to a close and he left in 1939, just a few months after the former Freud publisher and Viennese émigré, Adolf Storfer, arrived. Storfer set about publishing "Gelbe Post," a German language periodical replete with articles on psychoanalysis, linguistics and Chinese culture. But limited finances, severe competition from a rival publisher, plus his own ill health, forced him to abandon this in spite of the support offered him through the many contributors in the international psychoanalytic community whose articles he published. The paper concludes by considering the relative historiographic fate of the men upon whom subsequent scholarship has been very unevenly focused.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherEdinburgh University Press.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychoanalysis and historyen_HK
dc.rightsPsychoanalysis and History. Copyright © Edinburgh University Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleBingham Dai, Adolf Storfer, and the tentative beginnings of psychoanalytic culture in China, 1935-1941.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1460-8235&volume=6&issue=1&spage=93&epage=105&date=2004&atitle=Bingham+Dai,+Adolf+Storfer,+and+the+tentative+beginnings+of+Psychoanalytic+culture+in+China:+1935-1941en_HK
dc.identifier.emailBlowers, G:blowers@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBlowers, G=rp00577en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3366/pah.2004.6.1.93en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21850799-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33746277449en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros94162en_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage93en_HK
dc.identifier.epage105en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBlowers, G=6701855848en_HK

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