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Article: Deriving site-specific sediment quality guidelines for Hong Kong marine environments using field-based species sensitivity distributions

TitleDeriving site-specific sediment quality guidelines for Hong Kong marine environments using field-based species sensitivity distributions
Authors
KeywordsField monitoring
Quantile regression
Sediment quality guideline
Species sensitivity distribution
Issue Date2008
PublisherSociety of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://etc.allenpress.com/
Citation
Environmental Toxicology And Chemistry, 2008, v. 27 n. 1, p. 226-234 How to Cite?
Abstract
Field data of benthic communities and contaminant loadings in marine sediments measured in parallel can be used to derive sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) using a field-based species sensitivity distribution (f-SSD) approach. Recently, SQGs have been successfully derived from f-SSDs for the Norwegian continental shelf with an extensive survey (>1 million km2) and a large data set (1,902 sampling stations with 1,944 species). The present study examined the practicality of this approach in deriving SQGs for a much smaller geographical area, namely, the marine environment of Hong Kong (sea area: 1,651 km2), making use of databases of the government of Hong Kong special administrative region. As the construction of f-SSDs requires the use of a collection of responses from individual species to a chemical gradient in sediment, data screening criteria on the minimum abundance of the species were evaluated and optimized to ensure sufficient statistical power for estimating these responses. Sediment quality guidelines were derived for nine trace metals, total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and total polychlorinated biphenyls and compared with current SQGs in developed countries. The community-adjusted hazardous concentrations of 5% and 10% of the f-SSDs were adopted to represent the threshold effects level (TEL) and predicted effects level (PEL), respectively. The TELs derived from this f-SSD approach compares favorably with current SQGs, while the derived PELs were generally lower than the current SQGs, indicating that they are more protective. The f-SSDs can be directly utilized for probabilistic risk assessment, while the field-based SQGs can be used as site-specific guidelines or integrated into current SQGs. Our results suggest that the f-SSD approach can also be applicable to small areas such as Hong Kong. © 2008 SETAC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89339
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 2.826
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.641
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. City University of Hong Kong
  3. Universitetet i Oslo
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, KWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBjorgesæter, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLui, GCSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGray, JSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShin, PKSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, PKSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:55:36Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:55:36Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Toxicology And Chemistry, 2008, v. 27 n. 1, p. 226-234en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0730-7268en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89339-
dc.description.abstractField data of benthic communities and contaminant loadings in marine sediments measured in parallel can be used to derive sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) using a field-based species sensitivity distribution (f-SSD) approach. Recently, SQGs have been successfully derived from f-SSDs for the Norwegian continental shelf with an extensive survey (>1 million km2) and a large data set (1,902 sampling stations with 1,944 species). The present study examined the practicality of this approach in deriving SQGs for a much smaller geographical area, namely, the marine environment of Hong Kong (sea area: 1,651 km2), making use of databases of the government of Hong Kong special administrative region. As the construction of f-SSDs requires the use of a collection of responses from individual species to a chemical gradient in sediment, data screening criteria on the minimum abundance of the species were evaluated and optimized to ensure sufficient statistical power for estimating these responses. Sediment quality guidelines were derived for nine trace metals, total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and total polychlorinated biphenyls and compared with current SQGs in developed countries. The community-adjusted hazardous concentrations of 5% and 10% of the f-SSDs were adopted to represent the threshold effects level (TEL) and predicted effects level (PEL), respectively. The TELs derived from this f-SSD approach compares favorably with current SQGs, while the derived PELs were generally lower than the current SQGs, indicating that they are more protective. The f-SSDs can be directly utilized for probabilistic risk assessment, while the field-based SQGs can be used as site-specific guidelines or integrated into current SQGs. Our results suggest that the f-SSD approach can also be applicable to small areas such as Hong Kong. © 2008 SETAC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://etc.allenpress.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistryen_HK
dc.subjectField monitoringen_HK
dc.subjectQuantile regressionen_HK
dc.subjectSediment quality guidelineen_HK
dc.subjectSpecies sensitivity distributionen_HK
dc.titleDeriving site-specific sediment quality guidelines for Hong Kong marine environments using field-based species sensitivity distributionsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0730-7268&volume=27&spage=226&epage=234&date=2008&atitle=Deriving+site-specific+sediment+quality+guidelines+for+Hong+Kong+marine+environments+using+field-based+species+sensitivity+distributionsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLui, GCS: csglui@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLui, GCS=rp00755en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1897/07-078.1en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18092863en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38049088791en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros140380en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-38049088791&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume27en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage226en_HK
dc.identifier.epage234en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251759500033-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, KWH=19337480200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBjorgesæter, A=8070848700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KMY=7401860738en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLui, GCS=8613288600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGray, JS=7404300468en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShin, PKS=7004445653en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, PKS=7202365776en_HK

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