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Article: Computer simulations of high shore littorinids predict small-scale spatial and temporal distribution patterns on rocky shores

TitleComputer simulations of high shore littorinids predict small-scale spatial and temporal distribution patterns on rocky shores
Authors
KeywordsAggregation
Computer simulation
Echinolittorina
Hong Kong
Individual-based model
Mucus trails
Trail following
Issue Date2007
PublisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.html
Citation
Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2007, v. 342, p. 151-161 How to Cite?
AbstractHigh shore littorinid snails exhibit complex spatial distribution patterns, forming dense aggregations both in crevices and on crevice-free sections of rocky shores. To understand how these patterns may form, an individual-based computer simulation of littorinid behaviour, similar to those used to model social insects, was used to mimic snail movement on rocky shores. Individual littorinid movement patterns were simulated, along with chance interactions with other littorinids, their trails, crevices and any resultant decisions made by the littorinids when these interactions occurred. The simulation investigated how simple behavioural rules can predict spatial aggregation patterns and the persistence and variation of these aggregation patterns over timescales of several tidal cycles. Morisita's index of dispersal showed good agreement between the simulation and observed patterns of littorinids on-shore. Trail-following was vital in the simulation, since points where trails intersected with crevices, or points where 2 or more trails met, formed the site of aggregations. Both in the simulation and in reality, aggregations often occurred in identical positions over several tidal cycles, both within and outside crevices. This temporal predictability may be due to the persistence of mucus trails on the shore over successive tidal cycles. Removal of the influence of past mucus trails from the simulation resulted in far lower persistence of aggregations over time. The simulation, therefore, is an important tool in examining behavioural mechanisms of intertidal animals. It provides insights into how simple behaviour of grazing animals can explain complex population patterns and subsequently the community dynamics of algal-herbivore interactions. © Inter-Research 2007.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89338
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.554
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStafford, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorDavies, MSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:55:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:55:35Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series, 2007, v. 342, p. 151-161en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89338-
dc.description.abstractHigh shore littorinid snails exhibit complex spatial distribution patterns, forming dense aggregations both in crevices and on crevice-free sections of rocky shores. To understand how these patterns may form, an individual-based computer simulation of littorinid behaviour, similar to those used to model social insects, was used to mimic snail movement on rocky shores. Individual littorinid movement patterns were simulated, along with chance interactions with other littorinids, their trails, crevices and any resultant decisions made by the littorinids when these interactions occurred. The simulation investigated how simple behavioural rules can predict spatial aggregation patterns and the persistence and variation of these aggregation patterns over timescales of several tidal cycles. Morisita's index of dispersal showed good agreement between the simulation and observed patterns of littorinids on-shore. Trail-following was vital in the simulation, since points where trails intersected with crevices, or points where 2 or more trails met, formed the site of aggregations. Both in the simulation and in reality, aggregations often occurred in identical positions over several tidal cycles, both within and outside crevices. This temporal predictability may be due to the persistence of mucus trails on the shore over successive tidal cycles. Removal of the influence of past mucus trails from the simulation resulted in far lower persistence of aggregations over time. The simulation, therefore, is an important tool in examining behavioural mechanisms of intertidal animals. It provides insights into how simple behaviour of grazing animals can explain complex population patterns and subsequently the community dynamics of algal-herbivore interactions. © Inter-Research 2007.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Ecology Progress Seriesen_HK
dc.rightsMarine Ecology - Progress Series. Copyright © Inter-Research.en_HK
dc.subjectAggregationen_HK
dc.subjectComputer simulationen_HK
dc.subjectEchinolittorinaen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectIndividual-based modelen_HK
dc.subjectMucus trailsen_HK
dc.subjectTrail followingen_HK
dc.titleComputer simulations of high shore littorinids predict small-scale spatial and temporal distribution patterns on rocky shoresen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0171-8630&volume=342&spage=151&epage=161&date=2007&atitle=Computer+simulations+of+high+shore+littorinids+predict+small-scale+spatial+and+temporal+distribution+patterns+on+rocky+shoresen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps342151en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34548135312en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros136856en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34548135312&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume342en_HK
dc.identifier.spage151en_HK
dc.identifier.epage161en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248895700013-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStafford, R=14007374300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDavies, MS=35121268800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, GA=7406082821en_HK

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