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Article: Molecular phylogenetic identification of endophytic fungi isolated from three Artemisia species
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TitleMolecular phylogenetic identification of endophytic fungi isolated from three Artemisia species
 
AuthorsHuang, WY
Cai, Y
Surveswaran, S
Hyde, KD
Corke, H
Sun, M
 
KeywordsArtemisia
endophytic fungi
molecular identification
phylogenetic analysis
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherFungal Diversity Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hku.hk/ecology/mycology/FD/index.htm
 
CitationFungal Diversity, 2009, v. 36, p. 69-88 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractDiverse fungal species live inside plant tissues, some of which presumably occur in a mutualistic association. Some fungal endophytes are widespread and can be found in many different plant species, whereas others are highly specific to single hosts. In this study, we investigated the taxonomic identities and phylogenetic relationships of fungal endophytes isolated from three plant species, Artemisia capillaris, A. indica, and A. lactiflora, using a combination of morphological and molecular approaches. Morphological differences among the fungal isolates indicate that diverse distinct morphotypes might be present within the hosts. Thirty-four fungal isolates were selected for further molecular phylogenetic analysis using nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences, including both the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S gene region. The 34 endophytes were identified to various taxonomic levels, and some to the species level based on fungal sequences with known identities in GenBank. Our results suggest that Alternoria, Colletotrichum, Phomopsis, and Xylaria species are the dominant fungal endophytes in the Artemisia hosts, and some of these endophytes exhibit host and tissue specificity. This aspect can be further explored to understand the relationships between plant hosts and their fungal endophytes.
 
ISSN1560-2745
2013 Impact Factor: 6.938
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHuang, WY
 
dc.contributor.authorCai, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorSurveswaran, S
 
dc.contributor.authorHyde, KD
 
dc.contributor.authorCorke, H
 
dc.contributor.authorSun, M
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:55:11Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:55:11Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractDiverse fungal species live inside plant tissues, some of which presumably occur in a mutualistic association. Some fungal endophytes are widespread and can be found in many different plant species, whereas others are highly specific to single hosts. In this study, we investigated the taxonomic identities and phylogenetic relationships of fungal endophytes isolated from three plant species, Artemisia capillaris, A. indica, and A. lactiflora, using a combination of morphological and molecular approaches. Morphological differences among the fungal isolates indicate that diverse distinct morphotypes might be present within the hosts. Thirty-four fungal isolates were selected for further molecular phylogenetic analysis using nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences, including both the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S gene region. The 34 endophytes were identified to various taxonomic levels, and some to the species level based on fungal sequences with known identities in GenBank. Our results suggest that Alternoria, Colletotrichum, Phomopsis, and Xylaria species are the dominant fungal endophytes in the Artemisia hosts, and some of these endophytes exhibit host and tissue specificity. This aspect can be further explored to understand the relationships between plant hosts and their fungal endophytes.
 
dc.identifier.citationFungal Diversity, 2009, v. 36, p. 69-88 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage88
 
dc.identifier.hkuros166611
 
dc.identifier.issn1560-2745
2013 Impact Factor: 6.938
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.spage69
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89306
 
dc.identifier.volume36
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherFungal Diversity Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hku.hk/ecology/mycology/FD/index.htm
 
dc.relation.ispartofFungal Diversity
 
dc.subjectArtemisia
 
dc.subjectendophytic fungi
 
dc.subjectmolecular identification
 
dc.subjectphylogenetic analysis
 
dc.titleMolecular phylogenetic identification of endophytic fungi isolated from three Artemisia species
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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