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Article: Temperature-dependent toxicities of chlorothalonil and copper pyrithione to the marine copepod Tigriopus japonicus and dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula

TitleTemperature-dependent toxicities of chlorothalonil and copper pyrithione to the marine copepod Tigriopus japonicus and dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula
Authors
KeywordsGlobal warming
Thermal stress
Ecotoxicity test
Multiple stressors
QwikLite
Issue Date2008
PublisherAustralasian Society for Ecotoxicology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ecotox.org.au/aje.html
Citation
Australasian Journal of Ecotoxicology, 2008, v. 14 n. 2-3, p. 45-54 How to Cite?
AbstractThe anticipated anthropogenically-driven climate change may ultimately result in increased incidents of temperature extremes that will have profound implications on the toxicity of chemical contaminants and hence their ecological risks to marine organisms in the tropics and subtropics. We hypothesised that chemical toxicity generally increases with increasing temperature over the thermal tolerance range (TTR) of a species, and is further exacerbated at extreme temperatures (i.e. lower or higher than the TTR). To test this hypothesis, we investigated the acute toxicity of two commonly used antifouling biocides, chlorothalonil and copper pyrithione (CuPT), to the marine copepod Tigriopus japonicus and dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula over a wide range of water temperatures. Our results verified that toxicities of the two biocides, in terms of 96-h LC50 (for T. japonicus) and 24-h EC50 (for P. lunula), were highly temperature-dependent, although the profile of temperature-dependency varied between the two chemicals. The LC50 values of T. japonicus exposed to CuPT decreased with increasing temperature between 15–31°C (i.e. assumed TTR), whereas the LC50 values at 4 and 35°C were significantly lower than those at 10 and 25°C, respectively. The toxicity of chlorothalonil to the copepod followed the same pattern of CuPT between 25 and 35°C but the LC50 values between 4 and 25°C were somehow indifferent. In P. lunula, a similar temperature-dependent toxicity was also observed for CuPT but not for chlorothalonil. Such dissimilar temperature-dependent toxicity profiles between the two biocides may be partially attributable to the differences in temperature-mediated modifications of their physicochemical properties, bioavailability, toxicokinetics, and thus resultant toxicity to the test organism.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89273
ISSN
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.102

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBao, VWWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKoutsaftis, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:54:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:54:45Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAustralasian Journal of Ecotoxicology, 2008, v. 14 n. 2-3, p. 45-54en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1323-3475en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89273-
dc.description.abstractThe anticipated anthropogenically-driven climate change may ultimately result in increased incidents of temperature extremes that will have profound implications on the toxicity of chemical contaminants and hence their ecological risks to marine organisms in the tropics and subtropics. We hypothesised that chemical toxicity generally increases with increasing temperature over the thermal tolerance range (TTR) of a species, and is further exacerbated at extreme temperatures (i.e. lower or higher than the TTR). To test this hypothesis, we investigated the acute toxicity of two commonly used antifouling biocides, chlorothalonil and copper pyrithione (CuPT), to the marine copepod Tigriopus japonicus and dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula over a wide range of water temperatures. Our results verified that toxicities of the two biocides, in terms of 96-h LC50 (for T. japonicus) and 24-h EC50 (for P. lunula), were highly temperature-dependent, although the profile of temperature-dependency varied between the two chemicals. The LC50 values of T. japonicus exposed to CuPT decreased with increasing temperature between 15–31°C (i.e. assumed TTR), whereas the LC50 values at 4 and 35°C were significantly lower than those at 10 and 25°C, respectively. The toxicity of chlorothalonil to the copepod followed the same pattern of CuPT between 25 and 35°C but the LC50 values between 4 and 25°C were somehow indifferent. In P. lunula, a similar temperature-dependent toxicity was also observed for CuPT but not for chlorothalonil. Such dissimilar temperature-dependent toxicity profiles between the two biocides may be partially attributable to the differences in temperature-mediated modifications of their physicochemical properties, bioavailability, toxicokinetics, and thus resultant toxicity to the test organism.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAustralasian Society for Ecotoxicology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ecotox.org.au/aje.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAustralasian Journal of Ecotoxicologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectGlobal warming-
dc.subjectThermal stress-
dc.subjectEcotoxicity test-
dc.subjectMultiple stressors-
dc.subjectQwikLite-
dc.titleTemperature-dependent toxicities of chlorothalonil and copper pyrithione to the marine copepod Tigriopus japonicus and dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunulaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1323-3475&volume=14&issue=2-3&spage=45&epage=54&date=2008&atitle=Temperature-dependent+toxicities+of+chlorothalonil+and+copper+pyrithione+to+the+marine+copepod+Tigriopus+japonicus+and+dinoflagellate+Pyrocystis+lunulaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBao, VWW: h0492036@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKoutsaftis, A: apostolosk@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros168693en_HK
dc.identifier.volume14-
dc.identifier.issue2-3-
dc.identifier.spage45-
dc.identifier.epage54-

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