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Article: Arthropod 'rain' into tropical streams: The importance of intact riparian forest and influences on fish diets

TitleArthropod 'rain' into tropical streams: The importance of intact riparian forest and influences on fish diets
Authors
KeywordsAllochthonous inputs
Energy subsidies
Fish gut contents
Food webs
Riparian zone
Issue Date2008
PublisherCSIRO Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.publish.csiro.au/journals/mfr/
Citation
Marine And Freshwater Research, 2008, v. 59 n. 8, p. 653-660 How to Cite?
AbstractTerrestrial arthropods might represent an important energy source for stream predators, but these trophic linkages have seldom been studied in the tropics. Terrestrial arthropod inputs (essentially, arthropod 'rain') into four streams with different riparian vegetation (two draining shrublands and two draining forests) were measured over three consecutive seasons (dry, wet, dry) from 2005 to 2007 in monsoonal Hong Kong. Predatory minnows, Parazacco spilurus (Cyprinidae), were collected and their consumption of terrestrial arthropods was estimated. Inputs of arthropods were dominated by Diptera, Collembola, Formicidae and aerial Hymenoptera, accounting for ≥73% of the arthropod abundance. Seasonal variation was marked: numbers in the dry seasons were approximately half (47-57%) those in the wet season, and biomass fell to one-third (33-37%) of the wet-season value. Shrubland streams received 19-43% fewer individuals and 6-34% less biomass than shaded forest streams. An analysis of fish diets in three of the four streams showed that terrestrial insects and spiders were more important prey in the two forest streams, accounting for 35-43% of prey abundance (39-43% by volume) v. 28% (27%) in the shrubland stream. Because riparian vegetation is the source of terrestrial arthropod inputs to streams, degradation of streamside forests that reduce these inputs will have consequences for the diets of stream fishes. © CSIRO 2008.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89267
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.583
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.821
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China[HKU] 7619/05M
The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

We thank Lily Ng and M. H. Cheung for technical assistance and Dr Nancy Karraker for constructive comments on earlier drafts of the manuscript. We also thank the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) of the Hong Kong Government for permission to conduct field studies inside protected areas. A permit for the collection of fish and insects was given by the AFCD before the study began (permit reference number: (132) in AF CON 11/17 pt. 3). The work described in this paper was partially supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. [HKU] 7619/05M), and E. K. W. Chan was supported by a postgraduate studentship from The University of Hong Kong while this study was undertaken.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, EKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:54:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:54:40Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine And Freshwater Research, 2008, v. 59 n. 8, p. 653-660en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1323-1650en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89267-
dc.description.abstractTerrestrial arthropods might represent an important energy source for stream predators, but these trophic linkages have seldom been studied in the tropics. Terrestrial arthropod inputs (essentially, arthropod 'rain') into four streams with different riparian vegetation (two draining shrublands and two draining forests) were measured over three consecutive seasons (dry, wet, dry) from 2005 to 2007 in monsoonal Hong Kong. Predatory minnows, Parazacco spilurus (Cyprinidae), were collected and their consumption of terrestrial arthropods was estimated. Inputs of arthropods were dominated by Diptera, Collembola, Formicidae and aerial Hymenoptera, accounting for ≥73% of the arthropod abundance. Seasonal variation was marked: numbers in the dry seasons were approximately half (47-57%) those in the wet season, and biomass fell to one-third (33-37%) of the wet-season value. Shrubland streams received 19-43% fewer individuals and 6-34% less biomass than shaded forest streams. An analysis of fish diets in three of the four streams showed that terrestrial insects and spiders were more important prey in the two forest streams, accounting for 35-43% of prey abundance (39-43% by volume) v. 28% (27%) in the shrubland stream. Because riparian vegetation is the source of terrestrial arthropod inputs to streams, degradation of streamside forests that reduce these inputs will have consequences for the diets of stream fishes. © CSIRO 2008.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.publish.csiro.au/journals/mfr/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine and Freshwater Researchen_HK
dc.subjectAllochthonous inputsen_HK
dc.subjectEnergy subsidiesen_HK
dc.subjectFish gut contentsen_HK
dc.subjectFood websen_HK
dc.subjectRiparian zoneen_HK
dc.titleArthropod 'rain' into tropical streams: The importance of intact riparian forest and influences on fish dietsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1323-1650&volume=59&spage=653&epage=660&date=2008&atitle=Arthropod+‘rain’+into+tropical+streams:+the+importance+of+intact+riparian+forest+and+influences+on+fish+diets.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1071/MF07191en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-50249183908en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros151371en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-50249183908&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume59en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage653en_HK
dc.identifier.epage660en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258642400001-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, EKW=16241096200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, Y=35320669000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK

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