File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Gonadotropins and ovarian cancer

TitleGonadotropins and ovarian cancer
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://edrv.endojournals.org
Citation
Endocrine Reviews, 2007, v. 28 n. 4, p. 440-461 How to Cite?
AbstractOvarian epithelial cancer (OEC) accounts for 90% of all ovarian cancers and is the leading cause of death from gynecological cancers in North America and Europe. Despite its clinical significance, the factors that regulate the development and progression of ovarian cancer are among the least understood of all major human malignancies. The two gonadotropins, FSH and LH, are key regulators of ovarian cell functions, and the potential role of gonadotropins in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is suggested. Ovarian carcinomas have been found to express specific receptors for gonadotropins. The presence of gonadotropins in ovarian tumor fluid suggests the importance of these factors in the transformation and progression of ovarian cancers as well as being prognostic indicators. Functionally, there is evidence showing a direct action of gonadotropins on ovarian tumor cell growth. This review summarizes the key findings and recent advances in our understanding of these peptide hormones in ovarian cancer development and progression and their role in potential future cancer therapy. We will first discuss the supporting evidence and controversies in the "gonadotropin theory" and the use of animal models for exploring the involvement of gonadotropins in the etiology of ovarian cancer. The role of gonadotropins in regulating the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of OEC is next summarized. Relevant data from ovarian surface epithelium, which is widely believed to be the precursor of OEC, are also described. Finally, we will discuss the clinical applications of gonadotropins in ovarian cancer and the recent progress in drug development. Copyright © 2007 by The Endocrine Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89256
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 14.898
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.086
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChoi, JHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, ASTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuang, HFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, PCKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:54:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:54:32Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEndocrine Reviews, 2007, v. 28 n. 4, p. 440-461en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0163-769Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89256-
dc.description.abstractOvarian epithelial cancer (OEC) accounts for 90% of all ovarian cancers and is the leading cause of death from gynecological cancers in North America and Europe. Despite its clinical significance, the factors that regulate the development and progression of ovarian cancer are among the least understood of all major human malignancies. The two gonadotropins, FSH and LH, are key regulators of ovarian cell functions, and the potential role of gonadotropins in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is suggested. Ovarian carcinomas have been found to express specific receptors for gonadotropins. The presence of gonadotropins in ovarian tumor fluid suggests the importance of these factors in the transformation and progression of ovarian cancers as well as being prognostic indicators. Functionally, there is evidence showing a direct action of gonadotropins on ovarian tumor cell growth. This review summarizes the key findings and recent advances in our understanding of these peptide hormones in ovarian cancer development and progression and their role in potential future cancer therapy. We will first discuss the supporting evidence and controversies in the "gonadotropin theory" and the use of animal models for exploring the involvement of gonadotropins in the etiology of ovarian cancer. The role of gonadotropins in regulating the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of OEC is next summarized. Relevant data from ovarian surface epithelium, which is widely believed to be the precursor of OEC, are also described. Finally, we will discuss the clinical applications of gonadotropins in ovarian cancer and the recent progress in drug development. Copyright © 2007 by The Endocrine Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://edrv.endojournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEndocrine Reviewsen_HK
dc.rightsEndocrine Reviews. Copyright © The Endocrine Society.en_HK
dc.titleGonadotropins and ovarian canceren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0163-769X&volume=28&spage=440&epage=461&date=2007&atitle=Gonadotropins+and+ovarian+canceren_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, AST: awong1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, AST=rp00805en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/er.2006-0036en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17463396-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34250875316en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros130200en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34250875316&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage440en_HK
dc.identifier.epage461en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247063300003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoi, JH=7501395645en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, AST=23987963300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, HF=7405614660en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, PCK=55085135300en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats