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Article: Inhibition of acrylamide formation by vitamins in model reactions and fried potato strips
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TitleInhibition of acrylamide formation by vitamins in model reactions and fried potato strips
 
AuthorsZeng, X1
Cheng, KW1
Jiang, Y2
Lin, ZX4
Shi, JJ2 3
Ou, SY3
Chen, F1
Wang, M1
 
KeywordsAcrylamide
Chemical model system
Food model system
Fried potato strip
Vitamin
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodchem
 
CitationFood Chemistry, 2009, v. 116 n. 1, p. 34-39 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2009.01.093
 
AbstractThe capacities of 15 vitamins in reducing the formation of acrylamide were examined. Inhibitory activities of the water-soluble vitamins were tested in both chemical models containing acrylamide precursors (asparagines and glucose) and a food model system (fried snack products), while activities of fat-soluble vitamins were examined only in the latter model. Biotin, pyridoxine, pyridoxamine, and l-ascorbic acid exerted a potent inhibitory effect (>50%) on acrylamide formation in the chemical model system. Using the food model, it was shown that water-soluble vitamins are good inhibitors of acrylamide formation. On the other hand, only weak inhibitory effects were observed with fat-soluble vitamins. Effects of pyridoxal, nicotinic acid, and l-ascorbic acid were further examined using fried potato strips. Nicotinic acid and pyridoxal inhibited acrylamide formation in fried potato strips by 51% and 34%, respectively. Thus, certain vitamins at reasonable concentrations can inhibit the formation of acrylamide. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0308-8146
2012 Impact Factor: 3.334
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.576
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2009.01.093
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000266028800007
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZeng, X
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KW
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorLin, ZX
 
dc.contributor.authorShi, JJ
 
dc.contributor.authorOu, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, F
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, M
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:54:19Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:54:19Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractThe capacities of 15 vitamins in reducing the formation of acrylamide were examined. Inhibitory activities of the water-soluble vitamins were tested in both chemical models containing acrylamide precursors (asparagines and glucose) and a food model system (fried snack products), while activities of fat-soluble vitamins were examined only in the latter model. Biotin, pyridoxine, pyridoxamine, and l-ascorbic acid exerted a potent inhibitory effect (>50%) on acrylamide formation in the chemical model system. Using the food model, it was shown that water-soluble vitamins are good inhibitors of acrylamide formation. On the other hand, only weak inhibitory effects were observed with fat-soluble vitamins. Effects of pyridoxal, nicotinic acid, and l-ascorbic acid were further examined using fried potato strips. Nicotinic acid and pyridoxal inhibited acrylamide formation in fried potato strips by 51% and 34%, respectively. Thus, certain vitamins at reasonable concentrations can inhibit the formation of acrylamide. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationFood Chemistry, 2009, v. 116 n. 1, p. 34-39 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2009.01.093
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10781367
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2009.01.093
 
dc.identifier.epage39
 
dc.identifier.hkuros163916
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000266028800007
 
dc.identifier.issn0308-8146
2012 Impact Factor: 3.334
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.576
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-64449083004
 
dc.identifier.spage34
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89239
 
dc.identifier.volume116
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodchem
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofFood Chemistry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsFood Chemistry. Copyright © Elsevier BV.
 
dc.subjectAcrylamide
 
dc.subjectChemical model system
 
dc.subjectFood model system
 
dc.subjectFried potato strip
 
dc.subjectVitamin
 
dc.titleInhibition of acrylamide formation by vitamins in model reactions and fried potato strips
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Shi, JJ</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ou, SY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chen, F</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Kwong Living Trust Food Safety
  3. Jinan University
  4. Chinese University of Hong Kong