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Article: Distribution patterns of birds and insect prey in a tropical riparian forest

TitleDistribution patterns of birds and insect prey in a tropical riparian forest
Authors
KeywordsBuffer strips
Insectivores
South China
Subsidy
Tropics
Issue Date2008
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118501466/home
Citation
Biotropica, 2008, v. 40 n. 5, p. 623-629 How to Cite?
AbstractSpatial subsidies of energy and nutrients can influence the distribution of consumers in riparian habitats. This study compared the abundance and composition of bird assemblages and the availability of volant insect prey within the riparian zone (≤ 30 m from the stream) and further inland (100-250 m away) within a secondary forest in monsoonal Hong Kong. Replicated point-counts of birds and insect light trapping were conducted in each zone during the wet and dry season of 2006-2007. The biomass of adult aquatic insects in the riparian zone was nine to 12 times higher than inland during both seasons, however, total insect biomass (aquatic plus terrestrial insects) in the riparian zone was only 49 percent (wet season) and 18 percent (dry season) greater. More birds (both numbers of individuals and species) were recorded in the riparian zone, and this difference was particularly conspicuous during the wet season. Most of the wet-season difference was due to the greater number of insectivorous birds in the riparian zone (123% greater than inland), and may have reflected the relative availability of adult aquatic insects. These findings confirm the importance of riparian zones as feeding habitats for forest birds, and have implications for conservation planning and setting the boundaries of protected areas. © 2008 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89220
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.944
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.374
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
The University of Hong Kong
Research Grants Council of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China[HKU] 7619/05M
Funding Information:

EKWC was supported by a postgraduate studentship from The University of Hong Kong. The work described in this paper was partially supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China ( Project No. [HKU] 7619/05M). We thank the Agriculture, Fisheries, and Conservation Department of the Hong Kong Government for issuing a permit to deploy light traps in protected areas, and we also thank three anonymous referees for constructive comments.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, EKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, YTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:54:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:54:03Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiotropica, 2008, v. 40 n. 5, p. 623-629en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0006-3606en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89220-
dc.description.abstractSpatial subsidies of energy and nutrients can influence the distribution of consumers in riparian habitats. This study compared the abundance and composition of bird assemblages and the availability of volant insect prey within the riparian zone (≤ 30 m from the stream) and further inland (100-250 m away) within a secondary forest in monsoonal Hong Kong. Replicated point-counts of birds and insect light trapping were conducted in each zone during the wet and dry season of 2006-2007. The biomass of adult aquatic insects in the riparian zone was nine to 12 times higher than inland during both seasons, however, total insect biomass (aquatic plus terrestrial insects) in the riparian zone was only 49 percent (wet season) and 18 percent (dry season) greater. More birds (both numbers of individuals and species) were recorded in the riparian zone, and this difference was particularly conspicuous during the wet season. Most of the wet-season difference was due to the greater number of insectivorous birds in the riparian zone (123% greater than inland), and may have reflected the relative availability of adult aquatic insects. These findings confirm the importance of riparian zones as feeding habitats for forest birds, and have implications for conservation planning and setting the boundaries of protected areas. © 2008 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118501466/homeen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiotropicaen_HK
dc.subjectBuffer stripsen_HK
dc.subjectInsectivoresen_HK
dc.subjectSouth Chinaen_HK
dc.subjectSubsidyen_HK
dc.subjectTropicsen_HK
dc.titleDistribution patterns of birds and insect prey in a tropical riparian foresten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0006-3606&volume=40&spage=623&epage=629&date=2008&atitle=Distribution+patterns+of+birds+and+insect+prey+in+a+tropical+riparian+forest.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1744-7429.2008.00420.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-49749108959en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros151372en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-49749108959&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage623en_HK
dc.identifier.epage629en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258581100014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, EKW=16241096200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, YT=8519981100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, Y=35320669000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3147465-

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