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Article: Cinnamon bark proanthocyanidins as reactive carbonyl scavengers to prevent the formation of advanced glycation endproducts
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TitleCinnamon bark proanthocyanidins as reactive carbonyl scavengers to prevent the formation of advanced glycation endproducts
 
AuthorsPeng, X3
Cheng, KW3
Ma, J4
Chen, B4
Ho, CT1 2
Lo, C3
Chen, F3
Wang, M3
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jafcau
 
CitationJournal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry, 2008, v. 56 n. 6, p. 1907-1911 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf073065v
 
AbstractCinnamon bark has been reported to be effective in the alleviation of diabetes through its antioxidant and insulin-potentiating activities. In this study, the inhibitory effect of cinnamon bark on the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) was investigated in a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-glucose model. Several phenolic compounds, such as catechin, epicatechin, and procyanidin B2, and phenol polymers were identified from the subfractions of aqueous cinnamon extract. These compounds showed significant inhibitory effects on the formation of AGEs. Their antiglycation activities were not only brought about by their antioxidant activities but also related to their trapping abilities of reactive carbonyl species such as methylglyoxal (MGO), an intermediate reactive carbonyl of AGE formation. Preliminary study on the reaction between MGO and procyanidin B2 revealed that MGO-procyanidin B2 adducts are primary products which are supposed to be stereoisomers. This is the first report that proanthocyanidins can effectively scavenge reactive carbonyl species and thus inhibit the formation of AGEs. As proanthocyanidins behave in a similar fashion as aminoguanidine (AG), the first AGE inhibitor explored in clinical trials, they show great potential to be developed as agents to alleviate diabetic complications. © 2008 American Chemical Society.
 
ISSN0021-8561
2012 Impact Factor: 2.906
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.248
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf073065v
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000254177000015
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorPeng, X
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KW
 
dc.contributor.authorMa, J
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, B
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, CT
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, C
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, F
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, M
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:53:52Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:53:52Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstractCinnamon bark has been reported to be effective in the alleviation of diabetes through its antioxidant and insulin-potentiating activities. In this study, the inhibitory effect of cinnamon bark on the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) was investigated in a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-glucose model. Several phenolic compounds, such as catechin, epicatechin, and procyanidin B2, and phenol polymers were identified from the subfractions of aqueous cinnamon extract. These compounds showed significant inhibitory effects on the formation of AGEs. Their antiglycation activities were not only brought about by their antioxidant activities but also related to their trapping abilities of reactive carbonyl species such as methylglyoxal (MGO), an intermediate reactive carbonyl of AGE formation. Preliminary study on the reaction between MGO and procyanidin B2 revealed that MGO-procyanidin B2 adducts are primary products which are supposed to be stereoisomers. This is the first report that proanthocyanidins can effectively scavenge reactive carbonyl species and thus inhibit the formation of AGEs. As proanthocyanidins behave in a similar fashion as aminoguanidine (AG), the first AGE inhibitor explored in clinical trials, they show great potential to be developed as agents to alleviate diabetic complications. © 2008 American Chemical Society.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry, 2008, v. 56 n. 6, p. 1907-1911 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf073065v
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf073065v
 
dc.identifier.epage1911
 
dc.identifier.hkuros142345
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000254177000015
 
dc.identifier.issn0021-8561
2012 Impact Factor: 2.906
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.248
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid18284204
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-41849141611
 
dc.identifier.spage1907
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89205
 
dc.identifier.volume56
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jafcau
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleCinnamon bark proanthocyanidins as reactive carbonyl scavengers to prevent the formation of advanced glycation endproducts
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Ho, CT</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lo, C</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Wang, M</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  2. National Taiwan University
  3. The University of Hong Kong
  4. Hunan Normal University