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Article: Inhibitory effect of fruit extracts on the formation of heterocyclic amines
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TitleInhibitory effect of fruit extracts on the formation of heterocyclic amines
 
AuthorsCheng, KW2 1
Wu, Q2 1
Zong, PZ2 1
Peng, X2 1
Simon, JE2 1
Chen, F2 1
Wang, M2 1
 
KeywordsFruit extracts
Genotoxic heterocyclic amines
Phloridzin, chlorogenic acid, polyphenolics, proanthocyanidins
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jafcau
 
CitationJournal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry, 2007, v. 55 n. 25, p. 10359-10365 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf071820z
 
AbstractNatural extracts have attracted considerable attention for development into effective inhibitors against the formation of genotoxic heterocyclic amines (HAs) in processed foods. In this study, four fruit extracts (apple, elderberry, grape seed, and pineapple) were evaluated for their effects on HA formation in fried beef patties. Apple and grape seed extracts were found to be the most effective in both the degree of inhibition in the formation of individual HAs (2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3,4,8- trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (4,8-DiMeIQx), and 2-amino-1-methyl-6- henylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)) and in the reduction of total HA content (∼70% relative to the control). Activity-guided analysis of apple extract using model systems (PhIP- and MeIQx-producing models) showed that the proanthocyanidins, phloridzin and chlorogenic acid were responsible for reducing the amount of HAs formed. Proanthocyanidins were identified as the dominant inhibitors because they were strongly active against HA formation in both the PhIP and MeIQx model systems. For phloridzin, the inhibitory effect was observed only on the formation of PhIP. In contrast, chlorogenic acid, although effective against the formation of MeIQx, significantly enhanced the formation of PhIP. This is the first report showing the inhibitory activities of apple phenolics on the formation of heterocyclic amines. The findings provide valuable information for the development of effective strategies to minimize HA content of cooked meats and to identify several new natural products that may have new applications in the food industry. © 2007 American Chemical Society.
 
ISSN0021-8561
2013 Impact Factor: 3.107
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.428
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf071820z
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000251477100040
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KW
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorZong, PZ
 
dc.contributor.authorPeng, X
 
dc.contributor.authorSimon, JE
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, F
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, M
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:53:48Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:53:48Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractNatural extracts have attracted considerable attention for development into effective inhibitors against the formation of genotoxic heterocyclic amines (HAs) in processed foods. In this study, four fruit extracts (apple, elderberry, grape seed, and pineapple) were evaluated for their effects on HA formation in fried beef patties. Apple and grape seed extracts were found to be the most effective in both the degree of inhibition in the formation of individual HAs (2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3,4,8- trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (4,8-DiMeIQx), and 2-amino-1-methyl-6- henylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)) and in the reduction of total HA content (∼70% relative to the control). Activity-guided analysis of apple extract using model systems (PhIP- and MeIQx-producing models) showed that the proanthocyanidins, phloridzin and chlorogenic acid were responsible for reducing the amount of HAs formed. Proanthocyanidins were identified as the dominant inhibitors because they were strongly active against HA formation in both the PhIP and MeIQx model systems. For phloridzin, the inhibitory effect was observed only on the formation of PhIP. In contrast, chlorogenic acid, although effective against the formation of MeIQx, significantly enhanced the formation of PhIP. This is the first report showing the inhibitory activities of apple phenolics on the formation of heterocyclic amines. The findings provide valuable information for the development of effective strategies to minimize HA content of cooked meats and to identify several new natural products that may have new applications in the food industry. © 2007 American Chemical Society.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry, 2007, v. 55 n. 25, p. 10359-10365 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf071820z
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf071820z
 
dc.identifier.epage10365
 
dc.identifier.hkuros142344
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251477100040
 
dc.identifier.issn0021-8561
2013 Impact Factor: 3.107
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.428
 
dc.identifier.issue25
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid18004801
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38049035869
 
dc.identifier.spage10359
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/89200
 
dc.identifier.volume55
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jafcau
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectFruit extracts
 
dc.subjectGenotoxic heterocyclic amines
 
dc.subjectPhloridzin, chlorogenic acid, polyphenolics, proanthocyanidins
 
dc.titleInhibitory effect of fruit extracts on the formation of heterocyclic amines
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Natural extracts have attracted considerable attention for development into effective inhibitors against the formation of genotoxic heterocyclic amines (HAs) in processed foods. In this study, four fruit extracts (apple, elderberry, grape seed, and pineapple) were evaluated for their effects on HA formation in fried beef patties. Apple and grape seed extracts were found to be the most effective in both the degree of inhibition in the formation of individual HAs (2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3,4,8- trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (4,8-DiMeIQx), and 2-amino-1-methyl-6- henylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)) and in the reduction of total HA content (&#8764;70% relative to the control). Activity-guided analysis of apple extract using model systems (PhIP- and MeIQx-producing models) showed that the proanthocyanidins, phloridzin and chlorogenic acid were responsible for reducing the amount of HAs formed. Proanthocyanidins were identified as the dominant inhibitors because they were strongly active against HA formation in both the PhIP and MeIQx model systems. For phloridzin, the inhibitory effect was observed only on the formation of PhIP. In contrast, chlorogenic acid, although effective against the formation of MeIQx, significantly enhanced the formation of PhIP. This is the first report showing the inhibitory activities of apple phenolics on the formation of heterocyclic amines. The findings provide valuable information for the development of effective strategies to minimize HA content of cooked meats and to identify several new natural products that may have new applications in the food industry. &#169; 2007 American Chemical Society.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  2. The University of Hong Kong