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Article: Economic Impact of SARS: The Case of Hong Kong

TitleEconomic Impact of SARS: The Case of Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherMIT Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://mitpress.mit.edu/aep
Citation
Asian Economic Papers, 2004, v. 3 n. 1, p. 62-83 How to Cite?
AbstractSARS is the first deadly infectious disease of the 21st century. It started in the Chinese province of Guangdong in November 2002, and by August 2003, it had spread to 29 countries and 3 regions, with a cumulative total of 8,422 cases and 916 deaths. This paper describes the spread of the disease in Hong Kong and discusses its impact on the economy. SARS was an unexpected negative shock. The most significant negative effects were on the demand side, with local consumption and the export of services related to tourism and air travel severely affected in the short run. The economy did not experience a supply shock, as the manufacturing base in the Pearl River Delta was unaffected, and goods continued to be exported through Hong Kong normally. Initial alarmist reports and estimates about the negative economic impacts were not borne out. Fear and panic subsided quickly once the outbreak was under control, and the economy rebounded rapidly.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88855
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.382
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.499

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSiu, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, RYCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:49:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:49:05Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAsian Economic Papers, 2004, v. 3 n. 1, p. 62-83en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1535-3516en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88855-
dc.description.abstractSARS is the first deadly infectious disease of the 21st century. It started in the Chinese province of Guangdong in November 2002, and by August 2003, it had spread to 29 countries and 3 regions, with a cumulative total of 8,422 cases and 916 deaths. This paper describes the spread of the disease in Hong Kong and discusses its impact on the economy. SARS was an unexpected negative shock. The most significant negative effects were on the demand side, with local consumption and the export of services related to tourism and air travel severely affected in the short run. The economy did not experience a supply shock, as the manufacturing base in the Pearl River Delta was unaffected, and goods continued to be exported through Hong Kong normally. Initial alarmist reports and estimates about the negative economic impacts were not borne out. Fear and panic subsided quickly once the outbreak was under control, and the economy rebounded rapidly.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMIT Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://mitpress.mit.edu/aepen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Economic Papersen_HK
dc.rightsAsian Economic Papers. Copyright © MIT Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleEconomic Impact of SARS: The Case of Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1535-3516&volume=31&spage=62&epage=83&date=2005&atitle=Economic+Impact+of+SARS:+The+Case+of+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSiu, A: asiu@econ.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, RYC: rycwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySiu, AKF=rp01094en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, RYC=rp00068en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/1535351041747996-
dc.identifier.hkuros110319en_HK
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage62-
dc.identifier.epage83-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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