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Article: Laboratory markers of tumor burden in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A comparison of viral load and serologic tests for Epstein-Barr virus

TitleLaboratory markers of tumor burden in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A comparison of viral load and serologic tests for Epstein-Barr virus
Authors
KeywordsEpstein-Barr virus
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma
Serology
Tumor marker
Viral load
Issue Date2004
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/29331/home
Citation
International Journal Of Cancer, 2004, v. 112 n. 6, p. 1036-1041 How to Cite?
AbstractEpstein-Barr virus (EBV) is present within the tumor cells of most cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Recent studies suggest that tumor burden is proportional to the level of EBV DNA in blood and that rapid blood testing can be used to guide therapeutic intervention. The relative utility of viral load vs. serology has been insufficiently studied. In our study, EBV viral load was measured by quantitative PCR using either real-time or end-point detection systems in serum samples from 124 NPC patients (93 pretreatment, 13 relapsed, 18 in remission) and 40 controls. Serologic titers against EBV early antigen were measured in the same serum samples. EBV DNA was detectable in 64 of 93 untreated NPC patients (69%; mean viral load 11,211 copies/ml), 11 of 13 relapsed NPC patients (85%; mean 53,039 copies/ml) and 0 of 18 remission patients. EBV DNA was detectable in only 1 of 40 non-NPC controls (3%). In 34 instances where paired plasma and serum samples were available for testing, both were effective sample types, and there was no significant difference between end-point and real-time methods for measuring viral load. Early antigen (EA) IgA and IgG titers were elevated in most NPC patients regardless of whether their disease was active or in remission. EBV viral load was more informative than was EA serology for distinguishing remission from relapsed disease. EBV DNA measurement appears to be a noninvasive way to monitor tumor burden after therapy. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88473
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.531
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.657
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFan, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChua, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGulley, MLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:43:50Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:43:50Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Cancer, 2004, v. 112 n. 6, p. 1036-1041en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0020-7136en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88473-
dc.description.abstractEpstein-Barr virus (EBV) is present within the tumor cells of most cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Recent studies suggest that tumor burden is proportional to the level of EBV DNA in blood and that rapid blood testing can be used to guide therapeutic intervention. The relative utility of viral load vs. serology has been insufficiently studied. In our study, EBV viral load was measured by quantitative PCR using either real-time or end-point detection systems in serum samples from 124 NPC patients (93 pretreatment, 13 relapsed, 18 in remission) and 40 controls. Serologic titers against EBV early antigen were measured in the same serum samples. EBV DNA was detectable in 64 of 93 untreated NPC patients (69%; mean viral load 11,211 copies/ml), 11 of 13 relapsed NPC patients (85%; mean 53,039 copies/ml) and 0 of 18 remission patients. EBV DNA was detectable in only 1 of 40 non-NPC controls (3%). In 34 instances where paired plasma and serum samples were available for testing, both were effective sample types, and there was no significant difference between end-point and real-time methods for measuring viral load. Early antigen (EA) IgA and IgG titers were elevated in most NPC patients regardless of whether their disease was active or in remission. EBV viral load was more informative than was EA serology for distinguishing remission from relapsed disease. EBV DNA measurement appears to be a noninvasive way to monitor tumor burden after therapy. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/29331/homeen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Canceren_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Cancer. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectEpstein-Barr virusen_HK
dc.subjectNasopharyngeal carcinomaen_HK
dc.subjectSerologyen_HK
dc.subjectTumor markeren_HK
dc.subjectViral loaden_HK
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viral - isolation & purificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma - pathology - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshDNA, Viral - isolation & purificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshEpstein-Barr Virus Infections - complications - diagnosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshHerpesvirus 4, Human - genetics - immunology - isolation & purificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshIn Situ Hybridizationen_HK
dc.subject.meshNasopharyngeal Neoplasms - pathology - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Recurrence, Local - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Stagingen_HK
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value of Testsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTumor Burdenen_HK
dc.subject.meshTumor Markers, Biological - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshViral Loaden_HK
dc.titleLaboratory markers of tumor burden in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A comparison of viral load and serologic tests for Epstein-Barr virusen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0020-7136&volume=112&issue=6&spage=1036&epage=41&date=2004&atitle=Laboratory+Markers+Of+Tumor+Burden+In+Nasopharyngeal+Carcinoma:+A+Comparison+Of+Viral+Load+And+Serologic+Tests+For+Epstein-barr+Virusen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNicholls, J: jmnichol@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChua, D: dttchua@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNicholls, J=rp00364en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChua, D=rp00415en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ijc.20520en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15386346-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-8644257710en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros103158en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-8644257710&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume112en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1036en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1041en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000225077900017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, H=7402554020en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNicholls, J=7201463077en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChua, D=7006773480en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=7406034307en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, J=7101655565en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, S=8631603800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGulley, ML=7005189431en_HK

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