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Article: Molecular targets in gynaecological cancers

TitleMolecular targets in gynaecological cancers
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00313025.asp
Citation
Pathology, 2007, v. 39 n. 1, p. 26-45 How to Cite?
AbstractThe application of high throughput expression profiling and other advanced molecular biology laboratory techniques has revolutionised the management of cancers and is gaining attention in the field of gynaecological cancers. Such new approaches may help to improve our understanding of carcinogenesis and facilitate screening and early detection of gynaecological cancers and their precursors. Individualised prediction of patients' responses to therapy and design of personalised molecular targeted therapy is also possible. The studies of various molecular targets involved in the various signal pathways related to carcinogenesis are particularly relevant to such applications. At the moment, the application of detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus in management of cervical cancer is one of the most well established appliances of molecular targets in gynaecological cancers. Methylation, telomerase and clonality studies are also potentially useful, especially in assisting diagnosis of difficult clinical scenarios. This post-genomic era of clinical medicine will continue to make a significant impact in routine pathology practice. The contribution of pathologists is indispensable in analysis involving tissue microarray. On the other hand, both pathologists and bedside clinicians should be aware of the limitation of these molecular targets. Interpretation must be integrated with clinical and histopathological context to avoid misleading judgement. The importance of quality assurance of all such molecular techniques and their ethical implications cannot be over-emphasised. © 2007 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88376
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.968
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.049
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ANYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:42:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:42:34Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPathology, 2007, v. 39 n. 1, p. 26-45en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0031-3025en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88376-
dc.description.abstractThe application of high throughput expression profiling and other advanced molecular biology laboratory techniques has revolutionised the management of cancers and is gaining attention in the field of gynaecological cancers. Such new approaches may help to improve our understanding of carcinogenesis and facilitate screening and early detection of gynaecological cancers and their precursors. Individualised prediction of patients' responses to therapy and design of personalised molecular targeted therapy is also possible. The studies of various molecular targets involved in the various signal pathways related to carcinogenesis are particularly relevant to such applications. At the moment, the application of detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus in management of cervical cancer is one of the most well established appliances of molecular targets in gynaecological cancers. Methylation, telomerase and clonality studies are also potentially useful, especially in assisting diagnosis of difficult clinical scenarios. This post-genomic era of clinical medicine will continue to make a significant impact in routine pathology practice. The contribution of pathologists is indispensable in analysis involving tissue microarray. On the other hand, both pathologists and bedside clinicians should be aware of the limitation of these molecular targets. Interpretation must be integrated with clinical and histopathological context to avoid misleading judgement. The importance of quality assurance of all such molecular techniques and their ethical implications cannot be over-emphasised. © 2007 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00313025.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPathologyen_HK
dc.rightsPathology. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.en_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Transformation, Neoplasticen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGene Expressionen_HK
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Profiling - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenital Neoplasms, Female - diagnosis - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMolecular Diagnostic Techniques - methods - trendsen_HK
dc.titleMolecular targets in gynaecological cancersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0031-3025&volume=39&issue=1&spage=26&epage=45&date=2007&atitle=Molecular+targets+in+gynaecological+cancersen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, ANY:anycheun@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, ANY=rp00542en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00313020601153273en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17365821-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33847229125en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros130470en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33847229125&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage26en_HK
dc.identifier.epage45en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245074300003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK

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