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Article: A comparison of the effects of problem-based learning and lecturing on the development of students' critical thinking
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TitleA comparison of the effects of problem-based learning and lecturing on the development of students' critical thinking
 
AuthorsTiwari, A1 2
Lai, P3
So, M4
Yuen, K1
 
Keywords*problem-based learning
*thinking
California
Education, nursing/*methods
Hong Kong
Humans
Multicentre study [publication type]
Randomised controlled trial [publication type]
Students, nursing/*psychology
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110
 
CitationMedical Education, 2006, v. 40 n. 6, p. 547-554 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2929.2006.02481.x
 
AbstractBACKGROUND: Educational approaches are thought to have facilitative or hindering effects on students' critical thinking development. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) and lecturing approaches on the development of students' critical thinking. METHODS: All 79 Year 1 undergraduate nursing students at a university in Hong Kong were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 parallel courses delivered by either PBL (n = 40) or lecturing (n = 39) over 1 academic year. The primary outcome measure was students' critical thinking disposition as measured by the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI). Individual interviews were also conducted to elicit the students' perceptions of their learning experience. Data were collected at 4 timepoints spanning 3 years. RESULTS: The overall CCTDI and subscale scores for the PBL group were not significantly different from those of the lecture group at the first timepoint (pretest). Compared with lecture students, PBL students showed significantly greater improvement in overall CCTDI (P = 0.0048), Truthseeking (P = 0.0008), Analyticity (P = 0.0368) and Critical Thinking Self-confidence (P = 0.0342) subscale scores from the first to the second timepoints; in overall CCTDI (P = 0.0083), Truthseeking (P = 0.0090) and Analyticity (P = 0.0354) subscale scores from the first to the third timepoints; and in Truthseeking (P = 0.0173) and Systematicity (P = 0.0440) subscale scores from the first to the fourth timepoints. CONCLUSIONS: There were significant differences in the development of students' critical thinking dispositions between those who undertook the PBL and lecture courses, respectively. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2006.
 
ISSN0308-0110
2013 Impact Factor: 3.617
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2929.2006.02481.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000237597800011
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTiwari, A
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, P
 
dc.contributor.authorSo, M
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, K
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:41:02Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:41:02Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Educational approaches are thought to have facilitative or hindering effects on students' critical thinking development. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) and lecturing approaches on the development of students' critical thinking. METHODS: All 79 Year 1 undergraduate nursing students at a university in Hong Kong were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 parallel courses delivered by either PBL (n = 40) or lecturing (n = 39) over 1 academic year. The primary outcome measure was students' critical thinking disposition as measured by the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI). Individual interviews were also conducted to elicit the students' perceptions of their learning experience. Data were collected at 4 timepoints spanning 3 years. RESULTS: The overall CCTDI and subscale scores for the PBL group were not significantly different from those of the lecture group at the first timepoint (pretest). Compared with lecture students, PBL students showed significantly greater improvement in overall CCTDI (P = 0.0048), Truthseeking (P = 0.0008), Analyticity (P = 0.0368) and Critical Thinking Self-confidence (P = 0.0342) subscale scores from the first to the second timepoints; in overall CCTDI (P = 0.0083), Truthseeking (P = 0.0090) and Analyticity (P = 0.0354) subscale scores from the first to the third timepoints; and in Truthseeking (P = 0.0173) and Systematicity (P = 0.0440) subscale scores from the first to the fourth timepoints. CONCLUSIONS: There were significant differences in the development of students' critical thinking dispositions between those who undertook the PBL and lecture courses, respectively. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2006.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationMedical Education, 2006, v. 40 n. 6, p. 547-554 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2929.2006.02481.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike638107
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2929.2006.02481.x
 
dc.identifier.epage554
 
dc.identifier.hkuros119417
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237597800011
 
dc.identifier.issn0308-0110
2013 Impact Factor: 3.617
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid16700770
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646678172
 
dc.identifier.spage547
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88265
 
dc.identifier.volume40
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Education
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsMedical Education. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
 
dc.subject*problem-based learning
 
dc.subject*thinking
 
dc.subjectCalifornia
 
dc.subjectEducation, nursing/*methods
 
dc.subjectHong Kong
 
dc.subjectHumans
 
dc.subjectMulticentre study [publication type]
 
dc.subjectRandomised controlled trial [publication type]
 
dc.subjectStudents, nursing/*psychology
 
dc.titleA comparison of the effects of problem-based learning and lecturing on the development of students' critical thinking
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Lai, P</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>So, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yuen, K</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Faculty of Medicine
  3. Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  4. Hong Kong University of Science and Technology