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Article: Effect of positioning on back pain after coronary angiography

TitleEffect of positioning on back pain after coronary angiography
Authors
KeywordsBack pain
Chinese
Coronary angiography
Nursing
Positioning
Vascular complications
Issue Date2003
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/
Citation
Journal Of Advanced Nursing, 2003, v. 42 n. 5, p. 470-478 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Coronary angiography is a routine cardiac diagnostic procedure in Hong Kong. Patients are restricted to bedrest after the procedure due to potential vascular complications from using a femoral approach. Many patients are required to remain on bedrest for up to 24 hours after the procedure. The effects of reducing this bedrest time is still under investigation. In the meantime, nursing interventions aimed at decreasing patient discomfort due to prolonged bedrest are feasible to implement. Aims. The aims of this study were to evaluate the severity of back pain related to bedrest duration after coronary angiography and to compare the effects of changing patients' position in bed on their perceptions of back pain and on vascular complications. Methods. An experimental design was used, with patients randomly assigned either to a control or experimental group. The control group received the usual care, remaining supine and flat for 8-24 hours, with the affected leg straight. The experimental group changed their body position hourly, varying between supine, right side-lying, and left side-lying during the first 7 hours after coronary angiography. Results. A total of 419 patients participated in the study (control, n = 213; experimental, n = 206). Regardless of group assignment, back pain intensity increased with longer time on bedrest. In addition, the control group reported higher levels of pain at all five assessment times. Vascular complications in terms of bleeding at the femoral site were not significantly different between the control and experimental groups. Conclusion. The study findings suggest that patients may be able safely to change their position in bed earlier in the postcoronary angiography period than currently recommended in practice protocols. Changing position in bed may also reduce back pain, promote physical comfort, and possibly reduce patients' negative feelings toward coronary angiography.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88239
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.010
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChair, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTaylorPiliae, REen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:40:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:40:42Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Advanced Nursing, 2003, v. 42 n. 5, p. 470-478en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88239-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Coronary angiography is a routine cardiac diagnostic procedure in Hong Kong. Patients are restricted to bedrest after the procedure due to potential vascular complications from using a femoral approach. Many patients are required to remain on bedrest for up to 24 hours after the procedure. The effects of reducing this bedrest time is still under investigation. In the meantime, nursing interventions aimed at decreasing patient discomfort due to prolonged bedrest are feasible to implement. Aims. The aims of this study were to evaluate the severity of back pain related to bedrest duration after coronary angiography and to compare the effects of changing patients' position in bed on their perceptions of back pain and on vascular complications. Methods. An experimental design was used, with patients randomly assigned either to a control or experimental group. The control group received the usual care, remaining supine and flat for 8-24 hours, with the affected leg straight. The experimental group changed their body position hourly, varying between supine, right side-lying, and left side-lying during the first 7 hours after coronary angiography. Results. A total of 419 patients participated in the study (control, n = 213; experimental, n = 206). Regardless of group assignment, back pain intensity increased with longer time on bedrest. In addition, the control group reported higher levels of pain at all five assessment times. Vascular complications in terms of bleeding at the femoral site were not significantly different between the control and experimental groups. Conclusion. The study findings suggest that patients may be able safely to change their position in bed earlier in the postcoronary angiography period than currently recommended in practice protocols. Changing position in bed may also reduce back pain, promote physical comfort, and possibly reduce patients' negative feelings toward coronary angiography.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Advanced Nursingen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Advanced Nursing. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectBack painen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectCoronary angiographyen_HK
dc.subjectNursingen_HK
dc.subjectPositioningen_HK
dc.subjectVascular complicationsen_HK
dc.titleEffect of positioning on back pain after coronary angiographyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0309-2402&volume=42&issue=5&spage=470&epage=478&date=2003&atitle=Effect+of+positioning+on+back+pain+after+coronary+angiographyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, S: scsophia@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, S=rp00423en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2648.2003.02646.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12752867-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037831242en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros84840en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037831242&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume42en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage470en_HK
dc.identifier.epage478en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000182779800011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChair, SY=6602789567en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaylorPiliae, RE=6603071350en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, G=36723663500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, S=7404255378en_HK

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