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Article: Effectiveness of an educational intervention on levels of pain, anxiety and self-efficacy for patients with musculoskeletal trauma

TitleEffectiveness of an educational intervention on levels of pain, anxiety and self-efficacy for patients with musculoskeletal trauma
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/
Citation
Journal of Advanced Nursing, 2010, v. 66 n. 5, p. 1120-1131 How to Cite?
AbstractAIM: This paper is a report of a study of the effectiveness of a pain management educational intervention on level of pain, anxiety and self-efficacy among patients with musculoskeletal trauma and consequent orthopaedic surgery. BACKGROUND: Substantial evidence supports the use of preoperative education to improve patient outcomes. Educational interventions are common in preparing patients for orthopaedic surgery. METHODS: A pre- and post-test design (quasi-experimental) was employed in 2006 with patients assigned either to a control (usual care) or an experimental group (usual care plus educational intervention). The 30-minute educational intervention consisted of information about pain, coping strategies and breathing relaxation exercises. The outcome measures were scores for pain, anxiety, self-efficacy, analgesic use and length of hospital stay and these were measured before surgery and on day 2, day 4, day 7, 1 month and 3 months after surgery. RESULTS: A total of 125 patients completed the study (control, n = 63; experimental = 62). The experimental group reported statistically significantly lower levels of pain, less anxiety and better self-efficacy during hospitalization (before surgery to day 7), as compared to the control group. The experimental group had more requests for analgesics at day 2 only. There were no statistically significant effects on length of stay. At the 3-month evaluation, a statistically significant effect on anxiety level was found in favour of the experimental group. CONCLUSION: Patients may benefit from this educational intervention in terms of relieving pain, anxiety and improving self-efficacy, and the educational intervention could be incorporated as part of routine care to prepare musculoskeletal trauma patients for surgery.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88204
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.010
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, EMLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, SWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChair, SYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:40:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:40:16Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Advanced Nursing, 2010, v. 66 n. 5, p. 1120-1131en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88204-
dc.description.abstractAIM: This paper is a report of a study of the effectiveness of a pain management educational intervention on level of pain, anxiety and self-efficacy among patients with musculoskeletal trauma and consequent orthopaedic surgery. BACKGROUND: Substantial evidence supports the use of preoperative education to improve patient outcomes. Educational interventions are common in preparing patients for orthopaedic surgery. METHODS: A pre- and post-test design (quasi-experimental) was employed in 2006 with patients assigned either to a control (usual care) or an experimental group (usual care plus educational intervention). The 30-minute educational intervention consisted of information about pain, coping strategies and breathing relaxation exercises. The outcome measures were scores for pain, anxiety, self-efficacy, analgesic use and length of hospital stay and these were measured before surgery and on day 2, day 4, day 7, 1 month and 3 months after surgery. RESULTS: A total of 125 patients completed the study (control, n = 63; experimental = 62). The experimental group reported statistically significantly lower levels of pain, less anxiety and better self-efficacy during hospitalization (before surgery to day 7), as compared to the control group. The experimental group had more requests for analgesics at day 2 only. There were no statistically significant effects on length of stay. At the 3-month evaluation, a statistically significant effect on anxiety level was found in favour of the experimental group. CONCLUSION: Patients may benefit from this educational intervention in terms of relieving pain, anxiety and improving self-efficacy, and the educational intervention could be incorporated as part of routine care to prepare musculoskeletal trauma patients for surgery.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Advanced Nursingen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.comen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological-
dc.subject.meshAnxiety - nursing - prevention and control - psychology-
dc.subject.meshMusculoskeletal System - injuries - surgery-
dc.subject.meshPain - nursing - prevention and control - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPatient Education as Topic - methods-
dc.titleEffectiveness of an educational intervention on levels of pain, anxiety and self-efficacy for patients with musculoskeletal traumaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, EML: eliza07@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, EML=rp00529en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05273.x-
dc.identifier.pmid20337801-
dc.identifier.hkuros168368en_HK
dc.identifier.volume66-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage1120-
dc.identifier.epage1131-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276246800018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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