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Article: Address the gaps in tobacco cessation training and services: Developing professional organisational alliances to create social movements

TitleAddress the gaps in tobacco cessation training and services: Developing professional organisational alliances to create social movements
Authors
KeywordsCessation
Gaps
Global
Tobacco
Training
Issue Date2009
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0959-5236&site=1
Citation
Drug And Alcohol Review, 2009, v. 28 n. 5, p. 558-566 How to Cite?
AbstractIssues: To contribute towards reversing the tobacco pandemic, professional organisational alliances must reduce the wide international variability in the smoking rates among health-care professionals and students, and also address the gaps in tobacco cessation training and services. Approach: Ongoing international surveys for monitoring smoking rates could provide the impetus for these alliances to develop programs that reduce smoking rates among professional and lay populations. Key Findings: Health professional organisations must advocate for systematically implementing comprehensive tobacco cessation training programs. Implications: These programs can include both evidence-based interventions and experience-based learning innovations. These innovations can help individuals address the limitations of evidence-based guidelines. This shift from teaching individuals about changing-specific risk behaviours to engaging individuals to learn how to change any risk behaviour expands the reach and impact of behaviour change programs. Conclusions: Practitioners and staff need first-hand experience of these learning innovations before guiding patients through the same process. Using both evidence-based guidelines and experience-based learning methods, organisational leaders can develop professional alliances to create social movements that promote healthy habits in general. For example, they can develop voluntary learning programs in primary care and community settings that are led by patients and that are for patients. Such bottom-up approaches have greater potential yield in addressing gaps in health promotion and disease prevention, and particularly for tobacco cessation services. This strategy is a more feasible option for resource-limited, developing countries that cannot afford costly tobacco cessation programs. © 2009 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88194
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.405
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.106
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBotelho, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorWassum, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorBenzian, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSelby, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:40:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:40:08Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDrug And Alcohol Review, 2009, v. 28 n. 5, p. 558-566en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0959-5236en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88194-
dc.description.abstractIssues: To contribute towards reversing the tobacco pandemic, professional organisational alliances must reduce the wide international variability in the smoking rates among health-care professionals and students, and also address the gaps in tobacco cessation training and services. Approach: Ongoing international surveys for monitoring smoking rates could provide the impetus for these alliances to develop programs that reduce smoking rates among professional and lay populations. Key Findings: Health professional organisations must advocate for systematically implementing comprehensive tobacco cessation training programs. Implications: These programs can include both evidence-based interventions and experience-based learning innovations. These innovations can help individuals address the limitations of evidence-based guidelines. This shift from teaching individuals about changing-specific risk behaviours to engaging individuals to learn how to change any risk behaviour expands the reach and impact of behaviour change programs. Conclusions: Practitioners and staff need first-hand experience of these learning innovations before guiding patients through the same process. Using both evidence-based guidelines and experience-based learning methods, organisational leaders can develop professional alliances to create social movements that promote healthy habits in general. For example, they can develop voluntary learning programs in primary care and community settings that are led by patients and that are for patients. Such bottom-up approaches have greater potential yield in addressing gaps in health promotion and disease prevention, and particularly for tobacco cessation services. This strategy is a more feasible option for resource-limited, developing countries that cannot afford costly tobacco cessation programs. © 2009 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0959-5236&site=1en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDrug and Alcohol Reviewen_HK
dc.subjectCessationen_HK
dc.subjectGapsen_HK
dc.subjectGlobalen_HK
dc.subjectTobaccoen_HK
dc.subjectTrainingen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Education - methods - trends-
dc.subject.meshProfessional Role-
dc.subject.meshSocial Environment-
dc.subject.meshSocieties - trends-
dc.subject.meshTobacco Use Cessation - methods-
dc.titleAddress the gaps in tobacco cessation training and services: Developing professional organisational alliances to create social movementsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0959-5236&volume=28&issue=5&spage=558&epage=566&date=2009&atitle=Address+the+gaps+in+tobacco+cessation+training+and+services:+Developing+professional+organisational+alliances+to+create+social+movementsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, S: scsophia@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, S=rp00423en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00112.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19737214-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77049085778en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros167531en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77049085778&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage558en_HK
dc.identifier.epage566en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269539200011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBotelho, R=7003913030en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWassum, K=26637359200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBenzian, H=8835641000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSelby, P=35465440100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, S=7404255378en_HK

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