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Article: Stagnation as a distinct clinical syndrome: Comparing 'Yu' (stagnation) in traditional Chinese medicine with depression

TitleStagnation as a distinct clinical syndrome: Comparing 'Yu' (stagnation) in traditional Chinese medicine with depression
Authors
KeywordsChinese medicine
Depression
Stagnation
Issue Date2006
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
British Journal Of Social Work, 2006, v. 36 n. 3, p. 467-484 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Depression was translated into Chinese as yiyu, with reference to the yu syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine. Literally meaning 'not flowing, entangled or clogged', yu, or 'stagnation' in English, is, however, a construct distinct from depression. Objective: The study aimed to explore the construct of stagnation through scale development. Method: A concept-driven approach was adopted to generate candidate items for the Stagnation Scale. Other measures were a validity checking item, a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and a twelve-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Respondents were recruited by convenience and snowball sampling, resulting in 602 questionnaires being completed by adults between the ages of eighteen and sixty-five. Results: Exploratory factor analysis provided a three-factor, sixteen-item solution. The three factors were named Overattachment, Body-Mind Obstruction and Affect-Posture Inhibition. Cronbach's alphas of the entire scale and subscales ranged from 0.82 to 0.91. Correlations of the scale total with the validity checking item, BDI and GHQ-12 were 0.71, 0.53 and 0.48, respectively. Stagnation showed a pattern of associations with demographic variables different from depression. Conclusion: The Stagnation Scale has good psychometric properties, and has meaningful factor structures. The evidence supports the contention that stagnation is a clinical syndrome distinct from depression. The new concept has important implications for social work practice.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88127
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.027
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.771
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, DYFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, YYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:39:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:39:08Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Social Work, 2006, v. 36 n. 3, p. 467-484en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0045-3102en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88127-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Depression was translated into Chinese as yiyu, with reference to the yu syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine. Literally meaning 'not flowing, entangled or clogged', yu, or 'stagnation' in English, is, however, a construct distinct from depression. Objective: The study aimed to explore the construct of stagnation through scale development. Method: A concept-driven approach was adopted to generate candidate items for the Stagnation Scale. Other measures were a validity checking item, a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and a twelve-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Respondents were recruited by convenience and snowball sampling, resulting in 602 questionnaires being completed by adults between the ages of eighteen and sixty-five. Results: Exploratory factor analysis provided a three-factor, sixteen-item solution. The three factors were named Overattachment, Body-Mind Obstruction and Affect-Posture Inhibition. Cronbach's alphas of the entire scale and subscales ranged from 0.82 to 0.91. Correlations of the scale total with the validity checking item, BDI and GHQ-12 were 0.71, 0.53 and 0.48, respectively. Stagnation showed a pattern of associations with demographic variables different from depression. Conclusion: The Stagnation Scale has good psychometric properties, and has meaningful factor structures. The evidence supports the contention that stagnation is a clinical syndrome distinct from depression. The new concept has important implications for social work practice.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Social Worken_HK
dc.rightsThe British Journal of Social Work. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectChinese medicineen_HK
dc.subjectDepressionen_HK
dc.subjectStagnationen_HK
dc.titleStagnation as a distinct clinical syndrome: Comparing 'Yu' (stagnation) in traditional Chinese medicine with depressionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0045-3102&volume=36&issue=3&spage=467&epage=484&date=2006&atitle=Stagnation+as+a+distinct+clinical+syndrome:+Comparing+%27Yu%27+(Stagnation)+in+traditional+Chinese+medicine+with+depressionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, SM: ngsiuman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, SM=rp00611en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjsw/bcl008en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646253182en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros123052en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646253182&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage467en_HK
dc.identifier.epage484en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237006400008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, SM=7403358478en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=35274549700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, DYF=7402971943en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, YY=7403041699en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, RTH=8620896500en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike600819-

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