File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: A study on the efficacy of body-mind-spirit group therapy for patients with breast cancer

TitleA study on the efficacy of body-mind-spirit group therapy for patients with breast cancer
Authors
KeywordsAnxiety
Body-mind-spirit group therapy
Breast cancer
Depression
Holistic well-being
Nursing
Issue Date2008
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Nursing, 2008, v. 17 n. 19, p. 2539-2549 How to Cite?
AbstractAims and objectives. This study aims to understand the effects of culturally enriched body-mind-spirit group therapy on anxiety, depression and holistic well-being among women with breast cancer and to examine patients' views on what aspects of group therapy worked to enhance their health. Design. The study was designed using multiple methods, which consisted of a randomised controlled trial and a focus group interview. Methods. A total of 16 subjects in the control group received the standard care of a physician's treatment at the outpatient department. In addition to standard care, 12 subjects in the experimental group received 10 sessions of weekly body-mind-spirit group therapy for 180 minutes each. This therapy integrates concepts and practices of traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine (e.g. positive psychology and forgiveness therapy). The subjects in the experimental group were invited to participate in a focus group interview regarding their perceptions of the change mechanisms that occurred in group therapy. Results. The results of analysis of covariance indicated that after a two-month trial, there was a similarity between the experimental and control groups in reducing the scores of Beck depression inventory and increasing the scores of body-mind-spirit well-being. However, subjects in the experimental group had a better reduction of the scores of state anxiety inventory than subjects in the control group. The qualitative analysis yielded eight domains: (i) imparting of information, (ii) interpersonal learning, (iii) catharsis, (iv) universality, (v) group cohesiveness, (vi) altruism, (vii) instillation of hope and (viii) existential factors. These domains illustrate how the therapeutic effects of group therapy worked to reduce patients' anxiety. Conclusion. The culturally sensitive body-mind-spirit group therapy reduced anxiety among outpatients with breast cancer. Relevance to clinical practice. The involvement of mental health nurses in providing group therapy for cancer patients could enhance the quality of care in psycho-ontological nursing. © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
DescriptionThis journal issue entitled: Special Issue: Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88113
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.384
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.755
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, CJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHsiung, PCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChang, KJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, YFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, KCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, FHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:38:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:38:57Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Nursing, 2008, v. 17 n. 19, p. 2539-2549en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88113-
dc.descriptionThis journal issue entitled: Special Issue: Complementary and Alternative Medicine-
dc.description.abstractAims and objectives. This study aims to understand the effects of culturally enriched body-mind-spirit group therapy on anxiety, depression and holistic well-being among women with breast cancer and to examine patients' views on what aspects of group therapy worked to enhance their health. Design. The study was designed using multiple methods, which consisted of a randomised controlled trial and a focus group interview. Methods. A total of 16 subjects in the control group received the standard care of a physician's treatment at the outpatient department. In addition to standard care, 12 subjects in the experimental group received 10 sessions of weekly body-mind-spirit group therapy for 180 minutes each. This therapy integrates concepts and practices of traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine (e.g. positive psychology and forgiveness therapy). The subjects in the experimental group were invited to participate in a focus group interview regarding their perceptions of the change mechanisms that occurred in group therapy. Results. The results of analysis of covariance indicated that after a two-month trial, there was a similarity between the experimental and control groups in reducing the scores of Beck depression inventory and increasing the scores of body-mind-spirit well-being. However, subjects in the experimental group had a better reduction of the scores of state anxiety inventory than subjects in the control group. The qualitative analysis yielded eight domains: (i) imparting of information, (ii) interpersonal learning, (iii) catharsis, (iv) universality, (v) group cohesiveness, (vi) altruism, (vii) instillation of hope and (viii) existential factors. These domains illustrate how the therapeutic effects of group therapy worked to reduce patients' anxiety. Conclusion. The culturally sensitive body-mind-spirit group therapy reduced anxiety among outpatients with breast cancer. Relevance to clinical practice. The involvement of mental health nurses in providing group therapy for cancer patients could enhance the quality of care in psycho-ontological nursing. © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Nursingen_HK
dc.subjectAnxietyen_HK
dc.subjectBody-mind-spirit group therapyen_HK
dc.subjectBreast canceren_HK
dc.subjectDepressionen_HK
dc.subjectHolistic well-beingen_HK
dc.subjectNursingen_HK
dc.titleA study on the efficacy of body-mind-spirit group therapy for patients with breast canceren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, SM: ngsiuman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, SM=rp00611en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02296.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18808621-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-52049086919en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros159686en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros159683-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-52049086919&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue19en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2539en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2549en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000259309400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, CJ=23482264900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsiung, PC=7005354310en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, KJ=36071657200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, YF=24830728400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, KC=24598349100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsiao, FH=7006744649en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, SM=7403358478en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=35274549700en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats