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Article: The measurement of Body-Mind-Spirit well-being: Toward multidimensionality and transcultural applicability

TitleThe measurement of Body-Mind-Spirit well-being: Toward multidimensionality and transcultural applicability
Authors
KeywordsBody-Mind-Spirit model
Health assessment
Holistic health
Issue Date2005
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at hhttp://www.tandfonline.com/WSHC
Citation
Social Work In Health Care, 2005, v. 41 n. 1, p. 33-52 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Body-Mind-Spirit model of health promotion (Chan, Ho, & Chow, 2002) guided the construction of a multidimensional inventory for assessing holistic health. Named Body-Mind-Spirit Well-Being Inventory (BMSWBI), it comprises four scales: Physical Distress, Daily Functioning, Affect, and Spirituality (differentiated from religiosity and conceived as ecumenical). Respondents (674 Chinese adults from Hong Kong) completed the BMSWBI via the Internet. Results indicate that all four scales have high reliability, with alpha coefficients ranging from .87 to .92, and concurrent validity. Factor analysis indicates that (a) positive and negative affect form two distinct factors, and (b) spirituality comprises three distinct aspects: tranquility, resistance to disorientation, and resilience. Spirituality is positively associated with mental well-being, positive affect, satisfaction with life, and hope; but negatively associated with negative affect and perceived stress. These results suggest that the inventory may be used to assess different dimensions of health satisfactorily. © 2005 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88111
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.8
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.354
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, JKYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, DYFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:38:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:38:56Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSocial Work In Health Care, 2005, v. 41 n. 1, p. 33-52en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0098-1389en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88111-
dc.description.abstractThe Body-Mind-Spirit model of health promotion (Chan, Ho, & Chow, 2002) guided the construction of a multidimensional inventory for assessing holistic health. Named Body-Mind-Spirit Well-Being Inventory (BMSWBI), it comprises four scales: Physical Distress, Daily Functioning, Affect, and Spirituality (differentiated from religiosity and conceived as ecumenical). Respondents (674 Chinese adults from Hong Kong) completed the BMSWBI via the Internet. Results indicate that all four scales have high reliability, with alpha coefficients ranging from .87 to .92, and concurrent validity. Factor analysis indicates that (a) positive and negative affect form two distinct factors, and (b) spirituality comprises three distinct aspects: tranquility, resistance to disorientation, and resilience. Spirituality is positively associated with mental well-being, positive affect, satisfaction with life, and hope; but negatively associated with negative affect and perceived stress. These results suggest that the inventory may be used to assess different dimensions of health satisfactorily. © 2005 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at hhttp://www.tandfonline.com/WSHCen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Work in Health Careen_HK
dc.subjectBody-Mind-Spirit modelen_HK
dc.subjectHealth assessmenten_HK
dc.subjectHolistic healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Health - ethnology-
dc.subject.meshHolistic Health-
dc.subject.meshMind-Body Relations, Metaphysical-
dc.subject.meshPersonality Inventory - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshSpirituality-
dc.titleThe measurement of Body-Mind-Spirit well-being: Toward multidimensionality and transcultural applicabilityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, SM: ngsiuman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CHY: chancelia@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, SM=rp00611en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CHY=rp00498en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1300/J010v41n01_03en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16048855-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-23944499817en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros105542en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-23944499817&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume41en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage33en_HK
dc.identifier.epage52en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231300900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, SM=7403358478en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, JKY=8700345200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=35274549700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CHY=27171015400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, DYF=7402971943en_HK

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