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Article: Association between sleeping hours, working hours and obesity in Hong Kong Chinese: The 'better health for better Hong Kong' health promotion campaign

TitleAssociation between sleeping hours, working hours and obesity in Hong Kong Chinese: The 'better health for better Hong Kong' health promotion campaign
Authors
KeywordsHealth promotion
Hong Kong Chinese
Sleeping hours
Working hours
Issue Date2007
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ijo/
Citation
International Journal Of Obesity, 2007, v. 31 n. 2, p. 254-260 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To study the inter-relationships between sleeping hours, working hours and obesity in subjects from a working population. Research design: A cross-sectional observation study under the 'Better Health for Better Hong Kong' Campaign, which is a territory-wide health awareness and promotion program. Subjects: 4793 subjects (2353 (49.1%) men and 2440 (50.9%) women). Their mean age (±s.d.) was 42.4±8.9 years (range 17-83 years, median 43.0 years). Subjects were randomly selected using computer-generated codes in accordance to the distribution of occupational groups in Hong Kong. Results: The mean daily sleeping time was 7.06±1.03 h (women vs men: 7.14±1.08 h vs 6.98±0.96 h, P=0.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) was associated with reducing number of sleeping hours and increasing number of working hours reaching significance in the whole group as well as among male subjects. Those with short sleeping hour (6 h or less) and long working hours (>9 h) had the highest BMI and waist in both men and women. Based on multiple regression analysis with age, smoking, alcohol drinking, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean daily sleeping hours and working hours as independent variables, BMI was independently associated with age, systolic and diastolic blood pressure in women, whereas waist was associated with age, smoking and blood pressure. In men, blood pressure, sleeping hours and working hours were independently associated with BMI, whereas waist was independently associated with age, smoking, blood pressure, sleeping hours and working hours in men. Conclusion: Obesity is associated with reduced sleeping hours and long working hours in men among Hong Kong Chinese working population. Further studies are needed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this relationship and its potential implication on prevention and management of obesity. © 2007 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88086
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.337
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.752
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKo, GTCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, JCNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, AWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, PTSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, SSCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTong, SDYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:38:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:38:35Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Obesity, 2007, v. 31 n. 2, p. 254-260en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0307-0565en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88086-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To study the inter-relationships between sleeping hours, working hours and obesity in subjects from a working population. Research design: A cross-sectional observation study under the 'Better Health for Better Hong Kong' Campaign, which is a territory-wide health awareness and promotion program. Subjects: 4793 subjects (2353 (49.1%) men and 2440 (50.9%) women). Their mean age (±s.d.) was 42.4±8.9 years (range 17-83 years, median 43.0 years). Subjects were randomly selected using computer-generated codes in accordance to the distribution of occupational groups in Hong Kong. Results: The mean daily sleeping time was 7.06±1.03 h (women vs men: 7.14±1.08 h vs 6.98±0.96 h, P=0.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) was associated with reducing number of sleeping hours and increasing number of working hours reaching significance in the whole group as well as among male subjects. Those with short sleeping hour (6 h or less) and long working hours (>9 h) had the highest BMI and waist in both men and women. Based on multiple regression analysis with age, smoking, alcohol drinking, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean daily sleeping hours and working hours as independent variables, BMI was independently associated with age, systolic and diastolic blood pressure in women, whereas waist was associated with age, smoking and blood pressure. In men, blood pressure, sleeping hours and working hours were independently associated with BMI, whereas waist was independently associated with age, smoking, blood pressure, sleeping hours and working hours in men. Conclusion: Obesity is associated with reduced sleeping hours and long working hours in men among Hong Kong Chinese working population. Further studies are needed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this relationship and its potential implication on prevention and management of obesity. © 2007 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ijo/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Obesityen_HK
dc.subjectHealth promotionen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kong Chineseen_HK
dc.subjectSleeping hoursen_HK
dc.subjectWorking hoursen_HK
dc.titleAssociation between sleeping hours, working hours and obesity in Hong Kong Chinese: The 'better health for better Hong Kong' health promotion campaignen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0307-0565&volume=31&spage=254&epage=260&date=2007&atitle=Association+between+sleeping+hours,+working+hours+and+obesity+in+Hong+Kong+Chinese:+the+%27better+health+for+better+Hong+Kong%27+health+promotion+campaignen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, SM: ngsiuman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, SM=rp00611en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.ijo.0803389en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16718283-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846602714en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros139232en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846602714&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume31en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage254en_HK
dc.identifier.epage260en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244081500008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKo, GTC=7103172871en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, JCN=7403287000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, AWY=15834166800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, PTS=15836009800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, SSC=12807724800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTong, SDY=15836221200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, SM=7403358478en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, F=16743863800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=35274549700en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike666153-

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