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Article: ASEAN states, their reservations to human rights treaties and the proposed ASEAN commission on women and children

TitleASEAN states, their reservations to human rights treaties and the proposed ASEAN commission on women and children
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherThe Johns Hopkins University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/human_rights_quarterly/index.html
Citation
Human Rights Quarterly, 2008, v. 30 n. 2, p. 436-493 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article was inspired by claims made by a number of participants at the Fifth Workshop on an ASEAN Regional Mechanism on Human Rights in Kuala Lumpur (2006) that because all ASEAN states were party to the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, they shared common legal obligations and so the path was clear for moving forward with the Hanoi Action Plan's Commission on Women and Children. At that time, it was not clear that ASEAN would go any further than this commission. This article is therefore an examination of the law on reservations, but one that has at its core an examination of ASEAN states' reservations to the six main human rights treaties in light of Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties. Analysis is situated in the on-going debate about reservations to human rights treaties, as well as assessment of the significance and impact of the ASEAN reservations in themselves, in relation to other state parties, on the proposed Commission on Women and Children, and on international law generally. Since this article was written, ASEAN adopted a new Charter for the organization, which, in Article 14, allows for the creation of a human rights body, to operate in accordance with terms of reference yet to be decided by the Foreign Ministers of ASEAN. The Commission on Women and Children has yet to be established. © 2008 by The Johns Hopkins University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87973
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.631
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.428
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLinton, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:36:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:36:51Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHuman Rights Quarterly, 2008, v. 30 n. 2, p. 436-493en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0275-0392en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87973-
dc.description.abstractThis article was inspired by claims made by a number of participants at the Fifth Workshop on an ASEAN Regional Mechanism on Human Rights in Kuala Lumpur (2006) that because all ASEAN states were party to the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, they shared common legal obligations and so the path was clear for moving forward with the Hanoi Action Plan's Commission on Women and Children. At that time, it was not clear that ASEAN would go any further than this commission. This article is therefore an examination of the law on reservations, but one that has at its core an examination of ASEAN states' reservations to the six main human rights treaties in light of Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties. Analysis is situated in the on-going debate about reservations to human rights treaties, as well as assessment of the significance and impact of the ASEAN reservations in themselves, in relation to other state parties, on the proposed Commission on Women and Children, and on international law generally. Since this article was written, ASEAN adopted a new Charter for the organization, which, in Article 14, allows for the creation of a human rights body, to operate in accordance with terms of reference yet to be decided by the Foreign Ministers of ASEAN. The Commission on Women and Children has yet to be established. © 2008 by The Johns Hopkins University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe Johns Hopkins University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/human_rights_quarterly/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Rights Quarterlyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleASEAN states, their reservations to human rights treaties and the proposed ASEAN commission on women and childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0275-0392&volume= 30&issue=2&spage=pp. 436&epage=493&date=2008&atitle=ASEAN+States,+their+reservations+to+human+rights+treaties+and+the+proposed+ASEAN+Commission+on+Women+and+Childrenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLinton, S: suzannah@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLinton, S=rp01263en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/hrq.0.0010-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-44449105683en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros179461en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-44449105683&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume30en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage436en_HK
dc.identifier.epage493en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLinton, S=13807718600en_HK

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