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Article: Motor learning of a dynamic balancing task after stroke: Implicit implications for stroke rehabilitation

TitleMotor learning of a dynamic balancing task after stroke: Implicit implications for stroke rehabilitation
Authors
KeywordsMotor learning
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Physical Therapy Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ptjournal.org
Citation
Physical Therapy, 2006, v. 86 n. 3, p. 369-380 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and Purpose. After a stroke, people often attempt to consciously control their motor actions, which, paradoxically, disrupts optimal performance. A learning strategy that minimizes the accrual of explicit knowledge may circumvent attempts to consciously control motor actions, thereby resulting in better performance. The purpose of this study was to examine the implicit learning of a dynamic balancing task after stroke by use of 1 of 2 motor learning strategies: learning without errors and discovery learning. Participants and Meth-ods. Ten adults with stroke and 12 older adults practiced a dynamic balancing task on a stabilometer under single-task (balance only) and concurrent-task conditions. Root-mean-square error (in degrees) from horizontal was used to measure balance performance. Results. The balance performance of the discovery (explicit) learners after stroke was impaired by the imposition of a concurrent cognitive task load. In contrast, the performance of the errorless (implicit) learners (stroke and control groups) and the discovery learning control group was not impaired. Discussion and Conclusion. The provision of explicit information during rehabilitation may be detrimental to the learning/relearning and execution of motor skills in some people with stroke. The application of implicit motor learning techniques in the rehabilitation setting may be beneficial.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87958
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.799
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.198
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOrrell, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEves, FFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:36:36Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:36:36Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPhysical Therapy, 2006, v. 86 n. 3, p. 369-380en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0031-9023en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87958-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Purpose. After a stroke, people often attempt to consciously control their motor actions, which, paradoxically, disrupts optimal performance. A learning strategy that minimizes the accrual of explicit knowledge may circumvent attempts to consciously control motor actions, thereby resulting in better performance. The purpose of this study was to examine the implicit learning of a dynamic balancing task after stroke by use of 1 of 2 motor learning strategies: learning without errors and discovery learning. Participants and Meth-ods. Ten adults with stroke and 12 older adults practiced a dynamic balancing task on a stabilometer under single-task (balance only) and concurrent-task conditions. Root-mean-square error (in degrees) from horizontal was used to measure balance performance. Results. The balance performance of the discovery (explicit) learners after stroke was impaired by the imposition of a concurrent cognitive task load. In contrast, the performance of the errorless (implicit) learners (stroke and control groups) and the discovery learning control group was not impaired. Discussion and Conclusion. The provision of explicit information during rehabilitation may be detrimental to the learning/relearning and execution of motor skills in some people with stroke. The application of implicit motor learning techniques in the rehabilitation setting may be beneficial.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Physical Therapy Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ptjournal.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPhysical Therapyen_HK
dc.subjectMotor learningen_HK
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_HK
dc.subjectStrokeen_HK
dc.titleMotor learning of a dynamic balancing task after stroke: Implicit implications for stroke rehabilitationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid16506873-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644925819en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros115515en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644925819&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume86en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage369en_HK
dc.identifier.epage380en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236035800006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOrrell, AJ=12778780000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEves, FF=6701797804en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK

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