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Article: An evaluation of the role of skin temperature during heat adaptation

TitleAn evaluation of the role of skin temperature during heat adaptation
Authors
KeywordsAcclimation
Adaptation
Core temperature
Heat stress
Physical training
Sweating
Issue Date1996
Citation
Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, 1996, v. 158 n. 4, p. 365-375 How to Cite?
AbstractThis project sought to evaluate the importance of skin temperature during heat acclimation, using an isothermal-strain model. Two groups of seven matched males, participated (1 h per day, 10 days) in one of two conditions: (i) temperate physical training (TEMP: 22.4 ± 0.7°C, relative humidity (r.h.) 41.0 ± 0.9%): or (ii) combined physical training and heat acclimation (HEAT: 38.2 ± 0.7°C, r.h. 39.7 ± 1.3%). Isothermal strain was induced in both groups by rapidly elevating rectal temperature by 1°C (cycling), then holding it constant by manipulating external work. Subjects completed two three-phase heat stress tests (39.8 ± 0.1°C. r.h. 38.6 ± 1.2). consisting of 20 min rest, then 20 min cycling at each of 30% and 45% of peak power, before and after each regimen. While there was a difference of 4.2°C in mean skin temperature between treatments, both regimens elicited a similar peripheral sudomotor increase, indicating a core temperature dependent adaptation. However, based on significant pre- vs. post-acclimation decreases in average auditory canal temperature (0.4 ± 0.1°C). average forehead skin blood flow (26%), average perceived exertion (11%), and a 5% increase in average forehead sweat rate (0.1 ± 0.04 mg cm-2 min-1), the HEAT regimen elicited a more complete acclimation. While elevation in core temperature is critical to acclimation, it also appears necessary to expose subjects to an external thermal stress. This observation has not been previously demonstrated under conditions of isothermal strain, and verifies the importance of skin temperature elevation in the acclimation process.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87947
ISSN
2007 Impact Factor: 2.554
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRegan, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, DJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, NASen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:36:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:36:28Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationActa Physiologica Scandinavica, 1996, v. 158 n. 4, p. 365-375en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0001-6772en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87947-
dc.description.abstractThis project sought to evaluate the importance of skin temperature during heat acclimation, using an isothermal-strain model. Two groups of seven matched males, participated (1 h per day, 10 days) in one of two conditions: (i) temperate physical training (TEMP: 22.4 ± 0.7°C, relative humidity (r.h.) 41.0 ± 0.9%): or (ii) combined physical training and heat acclimation (HEAT: 38.2 ± 0.7°C, r.h. 39.7 ± 1.3%). Isothermal strain was induced in both groups by rapidly elevating rectal temperature by 1°C (cycling), then holding it constant by manipulating external work. Subjects completed two three-phase heat stress tests (39.8 ± 0.1°C. r.h. 38.6 ± 1.2). consisting of 20 min rest, then 20 min cycling at each of 30% and 45% of peak power, before and after each regimen. While there was a difference of 4.2°C in mean skin temperature between treatments, both regimens elicited a similar peripheral sudomotor increase, indicating a core temperature dependent adaptation. However, based on significant pre- vs. post-acclimation decreases in average auditory canal temperature (0.4 ± 0.1°C). average forehead skin blood flow (26%), average perceived exertion (11%), and a 5% increase in average forehead sweat rate (0.1 ± 0.04 mg cm-2 min-1), the HEAT regimen elicited a more complete acclimation. While elevation in core temperature is critical to acclimation, it also appears necessary to expose subjects to an external thermal stress. This observation has not been previously demonstrated under conditions of isothermal strain, and verifies the importance of skin temperature elevation in the acclimation process.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofActa Physiologica Scandinavicaen_HK
dc.subjectAcclimationen_HK
dc.subjectAdaptationen_HK
dc.subjectCore temperatureen_HK
dc.subjectHeat stressen_HK
dc.subjectPhysical trainingen_HK
dc.subjectSweatingen_HK
dc.titleAn evaluation of the role of skin temperature during heat adaptationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMacfarlane, DJ: djmac@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMacfarlane, DJ=rp00934en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid8971258-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030469164en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros22830en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030469164&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume158en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage365en_HK
dc.identifier.epage375en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996VY54700009-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRegan, JM=16948711300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacfarlane, DJ=7202978517en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaylor, NAS=7201546462en_HK

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