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Article: The relationship between initial errorless learning conditions and subsequent performance

TitleThe relationship between initial errorless learning conditions and subsequent performance
Authors
KeywordsGolf
Hypothesis testing
Implicit motor learning
Working memory
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/humov
Citation
Human Movement Science, 2005, v. 24 n. 3, p. 362-378 How to Cite?
AbstractThis experiment explores a suggestion by [Maxwell, J.P., Masters, R.S.W., Kerr, E., Weedon, E. (2001). The implicit benefit of learning without errors. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology A 54, 1049-1068] that an initial bout of implicit motor learning confers beneficial performance characteristics, such as robustness under secondary task loading, despite subsequent explicit learning. Participants acquired a complex motor skill (golf putting) over 400 trials. The environment was constrained early in learning to minimize performance error. It was predicted that in the absence of explicit instruction, reducing error would prevent hypothesis testing strategies and the concomitant accrual of declarative (explicit) knowledge, thereby reducing dependence on working memory resources. The effect of an additional cognitive task on putting performance was used to assess reliance on working memory. Putting performance of participants in the Implicit-Explicit condition was unaffected by the additional cognitive load, whereas the performance of Explicit participants deteriorated. The relationship between error correction and episodic verbal reports suggested that the explicit group were involved in more hypothesis testing behaviours than the Implici-Explicit group early in learning. It was concluded that a constrained, uninstructed, environment early in learning, results in procedurally based motor output unencumbered by disadvantages associated with working memory control. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87930
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.593
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPoolton, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, JPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:36:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:36:16Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHuman Movement Science, 2005, v. 24 n. 3, p. 362-378en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0167-9457en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87930-
dc.description.abstractThis experiment explores a suggestion by [Maxwell, J.P., Masters, R.S.W., Kerr, E., Weedon, E. (2001). The implicit benefit of learning without errors. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology A 54, 1049-1068] that an initial bout of implicit motor learning confers beneficial performance characteristics, such as robustness under secondary task loading, despite subsequent explicit learning. Participants acquired a complex motor skill (golf putting) over 400 trials. The environment was constrained early in learning to minimize performance error. It was predicted that in the absence of explicit instruction, reducing error would prevent hypothesis testing strategies and the concomitant accrual of declarative (explicit) knowledge, thereby reducing dependence on working memory resources. The effect of an additional cognitive task on putting performance was used to assess reliance on working memory. Putting performance of participants in the Implicit-Explicit condition was unaffected by the additional cognitive load, whereas the performance of Explicit participants deteriorated. The relationship between error correction and episodic verbal reports suggested that the explicit group were involved in more hypothesis testing behaviours than the Implici-Explicit group early in learning. It was concluded that a constrained, uninstructed, environment early in learning, results in procedurally based motor output unencumbered by disadvantages associated with working memory control. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/humoven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Movement Scienceen_HK
dc.rightsHuman Movement Science. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectGolfen_HK
dc.subjectHypothesis testingen_HK
dc.subjectImplicit motor learningen_HK
dc.subjectWorking memoryen_HK
dc.titleThe relationship between initial errorless learning conditions and subsequent performanceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0167-9457&volume=24&spage=362&epage=378&date=2005&atitle=The+relationship+between+initial+errorless+learning+conditions+and+subsequent+performanceen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoolton, JM: jamiep@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoolton, JM=rp00949en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.humov.2005.06.006en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16087262-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-26044449360en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros157947en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185235-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-26044449360&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage362en_HK
dc.identifier.epage378en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232439400006-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoolton, JM=8921750800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMaxwell, JP=7201610565en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8283393-

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