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Article: Self-perception of physical competences in preadolescent overweight Chinese children
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TitleSelf-perception of physical competences in preadolescent overweight Chinese children
 
AuthorsSung, RYT3
Yu, CW3
So, RCH2
Lam, PKW1
Hau, KT3
 
KeywordsObesity
Physical competences
Physical self-concept
Preadolescence
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcn
 
CitationEuropean Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2005, v. 59 n. 1, p. 101-106 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602044
 
AbstractObjective: To compare self-perceptions of physical competences in overweight and in normal weight preadolescent Chinese children. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Three primary schools and a university hospital in Hong Kong. Subjects: A total of 634 children, comprising 558 (462 normal weight, 96 overweight) aged 8-12y randomly sampled from three primary schools, and 76 similar age overweight children recruited from the community for a diet and exercise intervention programme. Measurements: Height, weight and percentage body fat were measured. Self-perceptions of physical competences were determined by Physical Self-Descriptive Questionnaire (PSDQ). Corresponding actual physical competences were measured by physical fitness tests. Results: Overweight children perceived themselves to have significantly more body fat than normal weight children, with poorer appearance, sports competence, endurance, coordination, flexibility, overall physical self-concept and self-esteem, but to be no less healthy, no less physically active and no less strong. Overweight children performed less well than normal weight children in measures of endurance, coordination and flexibility but better in strength. Poor self-perception of physical competences appeared only partly related to deficiencies in actual physical competences. Conclusion: Overweight children have poorer self-perception of their physical competences but do not perceive themselves to be less strong, healthy or physically active than normal weight children. Exercise programmes for overweight children could be more effective if designed with the knowledge of these self-perceptions. © 2005 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0954-3007
2012 Impact Factor: 2.756
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.193
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602044
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000226543500014
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorSung, RYT
 
dc.contributor.authorYu, CW
 
dc.contributor.authorSo, RCH
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, PKW
 
dc.contributor.authorHau, KT
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:36:06Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:36:06Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: To compare self-perceptions of physical competences in overweight and in normal weight preadolescent Chinese children. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Three primary schools and a university hospital in Hong Kong. Subjects: A total of 634 children, comprising 558 (462 normal weight, 96 overweight) aged 8-12y randomly sampled from three primary schools, and 76 similar age overweight children recruited from the community for a diet and exercise intervention programme. Measurements: Height, weight and percentage body fat were measured. Self-perceptions of physical competences were determined by Physical Self-Descriptive Questionnaire (PSDQ). Corresponding actual physical competences were measured by physical fitness tests. Results: Overweight children perceived themselves to have significantly more body fat than normal weight children, with poorer appearance, sports competence, endurance, coordination, flexibility, overall physical self-concept and self-esteem, but to be no less healthy, no less physically active and no less strong. Overweight children performed less well than normal weight children in measures of endurance, coordination and flexibility but better in strength. Poor self-perception of physical competences appeared only partly related to deficiencies in actual physical competences. Conclusion: Overweight children have poorer self-perception of their physical competences but do not perceive themselves to be less strong, healthy or physically active than normal weight children. Exercise programmes for overweight children could be more effective if designed with the knowledge of these self-perceptions. © 2005 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2005, v. 59 n. 1, p. 101-106 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602044
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602044
 
dc.identifier.epage106
 
dc.identifier.hkuros100145
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000226543500014
 
dc.identifier.issn0954-3007
2012 Impact Factor: 2.756
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.193
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid15354197
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-12144251051
 
dc.identifier.spage101
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87916
 
dc.identifier.volume59
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcn
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectObesity
 
dc.subjectPhysical competences
 
dc.subjectPhysical self-concept
 
dc.subjectPreadolescence
 
dc.titleSelf-perception of physical competences in preadolescent overweight Chinese children
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Prince of Wales Hospital Hong Kong
  2. Hong Kong Observatory
  3. Chinese University of Hong Kong