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Article: Improving aerobic power in primary school boys: A comparison of continuous and interval training
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TitleImproving aerobic power in primary school boys: A comparison of continuous and interval training
 
AuthorsMcManus, AM1
Cheng, CH1
Leung, MP2
Yung, TC2
Macfarlane, DJ1
 
KeywordsCardiorespiratory fitness
Children
Training
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.de/sportsmed
 
CitationInternational Journal Of Sports Medicine, 2005, v. 26 n. 9, p. 781-786 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2005-837438
 
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to assess whether the magnitude of change in aerobic power was different in boys (mean age 10.25 ± 0.50 y) who followed a high-intensity interval training protocol, compared to those who followed a moderate-intensity continuous training protocol. Boys were assigned to either a control group (n = 15), a continuous training group (n = 10), or an interval training group (n = 10). They completed peak oxygen uptake tests at baseline and following an 8-week training period. The control group continued with normal activity habits, whilst the continuous training group followed a 20-minute steady-state cycle protocol at 80-85% of the maximal heart rate, and the interval training group completed 30-s sprints on a cycle ergometer, interspersed with active rest periods. The two training protocols were designed to incur similar cardiovascular work over the 20 minutes of each training session. Significant increases (p < 0.05) in peak oxygen uptake were noted for both the interval and continuous training groups. The interval training group showed marked pre- to post-increases in both peak oxygen pulse, oxygen pulse at the ventilatory threshold, and ventilatory threshold that were not apparent in the continuous group boys. It would appear that a high-intensity interval protocol confers a different training effect in comparison to continuous steady-state training in boys. Possible mechanisms that underpin these adaptations may include increased blood volume and a concomitant adjustment in stroke volume. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG.
 
ISSN0172-4622
2012 Impact Factor: 2.268
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.141
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2005-837438
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000233213300012
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, AM
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, CH
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, MP
 
dc.contributor.authorYung, TC
 
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, DJ
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:36:04Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:36:04Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to assess whether the magnitude of change in aerobic power was different in boys (mean age 10.25 ± 0.50 y) who followed a high-intensity interval training protocol, compared to those who followed a moderate-intensity continuous training protocol. Boys were assigned to either a control group (n = 15), a continuous training group (n = 10), or an interval training group (n = 10). They completed peak oxygen uptake tests at baseline and following an 8-week training period. The control group continued with normal activity habits, whilst the continuous training group followed a 20-minute steady-state cycle protocol at 80-85% of the maximal heart rate, and the interval training group completed 30-s sprints on a cycle ergometer, interspersed with active rest periods. The two training protocols were designed to incur similar cardiovascular work over the 20 minutes of each training session. Significant increases (p < 0.05) in peak oxygen uptake were noted for both the interval and continuous training groups. The interval training group showed marked pre- to post-increases in both peak oxygen pulse, oxygen pulse at the ventilatory threshold, and ventilatory threshold that were not apparent in the continuous group boys. It would appear that a high-intensity interval protocol confers a different training effect in comparison to continuous steady-state training in boys. Possible mechanisms that underpin these adaptations may include increased blood volume and a concomitant adjustment in stroke volume. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Sports Medicine, 2005, v. 26 n. 9, p. 781-786 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2005-837438
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2005-837438
 
dc.identifier.epage786
 
dc.identifier.hkuros121603
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000233213300012
 
dc.identifier.issn0172-4622
2012 Impact Factor: 2.268
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.141
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid16237625
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27844544725
 
dc.identifier.spage781
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87914
 
dc.identifier.volume26
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.de/sportsmed
 
dc.publisher.placeGermany
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Sports Medicine. Copyright © Georg Thieme Verlag.
 
dc.subjectCardiorespiratory fitness
 
dc.subjectChildren
 
dc.subjectTraining
 
dc.titleImproving aerobic power in primary school boys: A comparison of continuous and interval training
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>The purpose of this study was to assess whether the magnitude of change in aerobic power was different in boys (mean age 10.25 &#177; 0.50 y) who followed a high-intensity interval training protocol, compared to those who followed a moderate-intensity continuous training protocol. Boys were assigned to either a control group (n = 15), a continuous training group (n = 10), or an interval training group (n = 10). They completed peak oxygen uptake tests at baseline and following an 8-week training period. The control group continued with normal activity habits, whilst the continuous training group followed a 20-minute steady-state cycle protocol at 80-85% of the maximal heart rate, and the interval training group completed 30-s sprints on a cycle ergometer, interspersed with active rest periods. The two training protocols were designed to incur similar cardiovascular work over the 20 minutes of each training session. Significant increases (p &lt; 0.05) in peak oxygen uptake were noted for both the interval and continuous training groups. The interval training group showed marked pre- to post-increases in both peak oxygen pulse, oxygen pulse at the ventilatory threshold, and ventilatory threshold that were not apparent in the continuous group boys. It would appear that a high-intensity interval protocol confers a different training effect in comparison to continuous steady-state training in boys. Possible mechanisms that underpin these adaptations may include increased blood volume and a concomitant adjustment in stroke volume. &#169; Georg Thieme Verlag KG.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Grantham Hospital Hong Kong