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Article: Situational state balances and participation motivation in youth sport: A reversal theory perspective

TitleSituational state balances and participation motivation in youth sport: A reversal theory perspective
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jEP_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal Of Educational Psychology, 2006, v. 76 n. 2, p. 369-384 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Reversal theory (Apter, 1982, 1989, 2001) is one of the motivational frameworks which attempts to examine human subjective experiences and behaviours. There are four dyads of metamotivational states (telic-paratelic, conformist-negativistic, autic-alloic, and mastery-sympathy) and individuals may prefer to be in one rather than the other of a dyad of states in a specific context such as sport participation (i.e. situational state balances). Aims. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between situational state balances and motives for sport and physical activity participation in adolescents using the theoretical framework of reversal theory. Their participation motives and the interacting factors of their situational state balances, gender, and level of participation were examined. Sample. Secondary school students (N = 1, 235) aged about 14 to 20 years who participated in competitive or recreational sport completed the Participation Motivation Inventory (Gill, Gross, & Huddleston, 1983) to assess their motives for sport and physical activity participation, and the Apter Motivational Style Profile (Apter International, 1999) to assess their situational state balances. Methods. Factor analysis of the participation motives yielded factors to which MANOVAs and ANOVAs were applied with situational state balance, gender, and participation level as independent variables. Results. Factor analysis resulted in seven motive factors: status, team/friend, excitement/challenge, skill, energy release, fitness, and situational factors. MANOVAs and ANOVAs indicated significant differences in the sport motives between the situational state balances, genders, and levels of participation, and between pairs of situational state balance groups in males and females of competitive and recreational level. The autic-alloic dyad produced the strongest motive strength differences of the four pairs. Conclusions. The variable of situational state balances is significantly linked with participation motives in sport. © 2006 The British Psychological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87903
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.304
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSit, CHPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLindner, KJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:35:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:35:56Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Educational Psychology, 2006, v. 76 n. 2, p. 369-384en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0007-0998en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87903-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Reversal theory (Apter, 1982, 1989, 2001) is one of the motivational frameworks which attempts to examine human subjective experiences and behaviours. There are four dyads of metamotivational states (telic-paratelic, conformist-negativistic, autic-alloic, and mastery-sympathy) and individuals may prefer to be in one rather than the other of a dyad of states in a specific context such as sport participation (i.e. situational state balances). Aims. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between situational state balances and motives for sport and physical activity participation in adolescents using the theoretical framework of reversal theory. Their participation motives and the interacting factors of their situational state balances, gender, and level of participation were examined. Sample. Secondary school students (N = 1, 235) aged about 14 to 20 years who participated in competitive or recreational sport completed the Participation Motivation Inventory (Gill, Gross, & Huddleston, 1983) to assess their motives for sport and physical activity participation, and the Apter Motivational Style Profile (Apter International, 1999) to assess their situational state balances. Methods. Factor analysis of the participation motives yielded factors to which MANOVAs and ANOVAs were applied with situational state balance, gender, and participation level as independent variables. Results. Factor analysis resulted in seven motive factors: status, team/friend, excitement/challenge, skill, energy release, fitness, and situational factors. MANOVAs and ANOVAs indicated significant differences in the sport motives between the situational state balances, genders, and levels of participation, and between pairs of situational state balance groups in males and females of competitive and recreational level. The autic-alloic dyad produced the strongest motive strength differences of the four pairs. Conclusions. The variable of situational state balances is significantly linked with participation motives in sport. © 2006 The British Psychological Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jEP_1.cfmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Educational Psychologyen_HK
dc.titleSituational state balances and participation motivation in youth sport: A reversal theory perspectiveen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0007-0998&volume=76&spage=369&epage=384&date=2006&atitle=Situational+state+balances+and+participation+motivation+in+youth+sport:+A+reversal+theory+perspectiveen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSit, CHP: sithp@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySit, CHP=rp00957en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/000709905X37190en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16719969-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33745651350en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros128884en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33745651350&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume76en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage369en_HK
dc.identifier.epage384en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000238313700009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSit, CHP=6602768457en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLindner, KJ=7102321315en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike638042-

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