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Article: Motor Performance as a Function of Audience Affability and Metaknowledge

TitleMotor Performance as a Function of Audience Affability and Metaknowledge
Authors
KeywordsExplicit learning
Implicit motor learning
Skilled performance
Issue Date2003
PublisherHuman Kinetics.
Citation
Journal Of Sport And Exercise Psychology, 2003, v. 25 n. 4, p. 484-500 How to Cite?
AbstractButler and Baumeister (1998) suggested that performance decrement of a difficult skill-based task occurring only in the presence of a supportive audience could be explained by "a cautious performance style" (p. 1226). A potential alternative explanation stems from Masters' (1992) contention that skill failure under pressure occurs when performers attempt to control motor performance using explicit knowledge. It was proposed that a skill acquired with minimal metaknowledge (i.e., a limited explicit knowledge base) would remain robust regardless of audience type. To test this hypothesis, a table tennis shot was learned with either a greater or a lesser bank of explicit task knowledge. Performance was subsequently assessed in the presence of observation-only audiences, supportive audiences, and adversarial audiences. Consistent with hypotheses, supportive audiences induced performance decrement in the explicit-learning group only. It was argued that supportive audiences engender higher levels of internally focused attention than do adversarial or observation-only audiences, increasing the chance of disruption to skill execution when performance characteristics involve a large amount of explicit processing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87896
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.379
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.237
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorBray, SRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEves, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBardswell, Ien_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:35:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:35:51Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Sport And Exercise Psychology, 2003, v. 25 n. 4, p. 484-500en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0895-2779en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87896-
dc.description.abstractButler and Baumeister (1998) suggested that performance decrement of a difficult skill-based task occurring only in the presence of a supportive audience could be explained by "a cautious performance style" (p. 1226). A potential alternative explanation stems from Masters' (1992) contention that skill failure under pressure occurs when performers attempt to control motor performance using explicit knowledge. It was proposed that a skill acquired with minimal metaknowledge (i.e., a limited explicit knowledge base) would remain robust regardless of audience type. To test this hypothesis, a table tennis shot was learned with either a greater or a lesser bank of explicit task knowledge. Performance was subsequently assessed in the presence of observation-only audiences, supportive audiences, and adversarial audiences. Consistent with hypotheses, supportive audiences induced performance decrement in the explicit-learning group only. It was argued that supportive audiences engender higher levels of internally focused attention than do adversarial or observation-only audiences, increasing the chance of disruption to skill execution when performance characteristics involve a large amount of explicit processing.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychologyen_HK
dc.subjectExplicit learningen_HK
dc.subjectImplicit motor learningen_HK
dc.subjectSkilled performanceen_HK
dc.titleMotor Performance as a Function of Audience Affability and Metaknowledgeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0895-2779&volume=25&spage=484&epage=500&date=2003&atitle=Motor+performance+as+a+function+of+audience+affability+and+metaknowledge.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, R: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, R=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0346316887en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros91607en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0346316887&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage484en_HK
dc.identifier.epage500en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, J=7202548559en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, R=7102880488en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBray, SR=7004426900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEves, F=6701797804en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBardswell, I=6504232827en_HK

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