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Article: Are physical activity and academic performance compatible? Academic achievement, conduct, physical activity and self-esteem of Hong Kong Chinese primary school children
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TitleAre physical activity and academic performance compatible? Academic achievement, conduct, physical activity and self-esteem of Hong Kong Chinese primary school children
 
AuthorsYu, CCW3
Chan, S3
Cheng, F1
Sung, RYT2 3
Hau, KT3
 
KeywordsChinese students
Physical activity
Physical self-description questionnaire
Self-esteem
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03055698.asp
 
CitationEducational Studies, 2006, v. 32 n. 4, p. 331-341 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03055690600850016
 
AbstractEducation is so strongly emphasized in the Chinese culture that academic success is widely regarded as the only indicator of success, while too much physical activity is often discouraged because it drains energy and affects academic concentration. This study investigated the relations among academic achievement, self-esteem, school conduct and physical activity level. The participants were 333 Chinese pre-adolescents (aged 8-12) in Hong Kong. Examination results and conduct grades were obtained from the school records. Global self-esteem was measured with the Physical self-description questionnaire (PSDQ), while physical activity patterns of the children were assessed with the Physical activity questionnaire for children (PAQ-C). Results showed that high academic achievers consistently attained better school conduct marks. However, physical activity level was quite an independent entity that was related neither to academic achievement nor school conduct. Furthermore, regression analyses showed that only academically high-achieving boys and physically active boys had higher self-esteem. © 2006 Taylor & Francis.
 
ISSN0305-5698
2013 Impact Factor: 0.351
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03055690600850016
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000241401400001
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorYu, CCW
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, S
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, F
 
dc.contributor.authorSung, RYT
 
dc.contributor.authorHau, KT
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:35:41Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:35:41Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractEducation is so strongly emphasized in the Chinese culture that academic success is widely regarded as the only indicator of success, while too much physical activity is often discouraged because it drains energy and affects academic concentration. This study investigated the relations among academic achievement, self-esteem, school conduct and physical activity level. The participants were 333 Chinese pre-adolescents (aged 8-12) in Hong Kong. Examination results and conduct grades were obtained from the school records. Global self-esteem was measured with the Physical self-description questionnaire (PSDQ), while physical activity patterns of the children were assessed with the Physical activity questionnaire for children (PAQ-C). Results showed that high academic achievers consistently attained better school conduct marks. However, physical activity level was quite an independent entity that was related neither to academic achievement nor school conduct. Furthermore, regression analyses showed that only academically high-achieving boys and physically active boys had higher self-esteem. © 2006 Taylor & Francis.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationEducational Studies, 2006, v. 32 n. 4, p. 331-341 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03055690600850016
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03055690600850016
 
dc.identifier.epage341
 
dc.identifier.hkuros129371
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000241401400001
 
dc.identifier.issn0305-5698
2013 Impact Factor: 0.351
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33750365684
 
dc.identifier.spage331
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87882
 
dc.identifier.volume32
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03055698.asp
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofEducational Studies
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectChinese students
 
dc.subjectPhysical activity
 
dc.subjectPhysical self-description questionnaire
 
dc.subjectSelf-esteem
 
dc.titleAre physical activity and academic performance compatible? Academic achievement, conduct, physical activity and self-esteem of Hong Kong Chinese primary school children
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Education is so strongly emphasized in the Chinese culture that academic success is widely regarded as the only indicator of success, while too much physical activity is often discouraged because it drains energy and affects academic concentration. This study investigated the relations among academic achievement, self-esteem, school conduct and physical activity level. The participants were 333 Chinese pre-adolescents (aged 8-12) in Hong Kong. Examination results and conduct grades were obtained from the school records. Global self-esteem was measured with the Physical self-description questionnaire (PSDQ), while physical activity patterns of the children were assessed with the Physical activity questionnaire for children (PAQ-C). Results showed that high academic achievers consistently attained better school conduct marks. However, physical activity level was quite an independent entity that was related neither to academic achievement nor school conduct. Furthermore, regression analyses showed that only academically high-achieving boys and physically active boys had higher self-esteem. &#169; 2006 Taylor &amp; Francis.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Kwai Chung Hospital
  2. Prince of Wales Hospital Hong Kong
  3. Chinese University of Hong Kong