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Article: Reinvestment and falls in community-dwelling older adults

TitleReinvestment and falls in community-dwelling older adults
Authors
KeywordsBalance
Falls
Movement Specific Reinvestment Scale
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Issue Date2008
PublisherSage Science Press (US). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=336
Citation
Neurorehabilitation And Neural Repair, 2008, v. 22 n. 4, p. 410-414 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Falls are common in older adults and have many adverse consequences. In an attempt to prevent further incidents, elder fallers may consciously monitor and control their movements. Ironically, conscious movement control may be one factor that contributes to disruption of automaticity of walking, increasing the likelihood of subsequent falls. Objective. The Movement Specific Reinvestment Scale (MSRS), which aims to measure the propensity for movement-related self-consciousness and for conscious processing of movement, was used to try to discriminate elder fallers from non-fallers. Methods. Fifty-two volunteer older adults, aged 65 or above, participated. In addition to the 10-item MSRS, participants completed the Mini-Mental State Examination questionnaire, Timed "Up & Go" test, and Four Word Short-Term Memory test. Demographics including age, gender, and history of falling were collected. Results. Elder fallers scored significantly higher than non-fallers on both the movement self-consciousness and conscious motor processing components of the MSRS. Logistic regression revealed a significant association between the MSRS (conscious motor processing component) and "faller or non-faller" status. Conclusions. Elder fallers may have a higher propensity to consciously control their movements. The MSRS shows potential as a clinical tool with which to predict falls in the elderly, as well as to gain insight into the perception of safety during walking in any impaired patient. Copyright © 2008 The American Society of Neurorehabilitation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87879
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.035
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.514
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, WLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, JPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, ABen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:35:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:35:39Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeurorehabilitation And Neural Repair, 2008, v. 22 n. 4, p. 410-414en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1545-9683en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87879-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Falls are common in older adults and have many adverse consequences. In an attempt to prevent further incidents, elder fallers may consciously monitor and control their movements. Ironically, conscious movement control may be one factor that contributes to disruption of automaticity of walking, increasing the likelihood of subsequent falls. Objective. The Movement Specific Reinvestment Scale (MSRS), which aims to measure the propensity for movement-related self-consciousness and for conscious processing of movement, was used to try to discriminate elder fallers from non-fallers. Methods. Fifty-two volunteer older adults, aged 65 or above, participated. In addition to the 10-item MSRS, participants completed the Mini-Mental State Examination questionnaire, Timed "Up & Go" test, and Four Word Short-Term Memory test. Demographics including age, gender, and history of falling were collected. Results. Elder fallers scored significantly higher than non-fallers on both the movement self-consciousness and conscious motor processing components of the MSRS. Logistic regression revealed a significant association between the MSRS (conscious motor processing component) and "faller or non-faller" status. Conclusions. Elder fallers may have a higher propensity to consciously control their movements. The MSRS shows potential as a clinical tool with which to predict falls in the elderly, as well as to gain insight into the perception of safety during walking in any impaired patient. Copyright © 2008 The American Society of Neurorehabilitation.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Science Press (US). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=336en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeurorehabilitation and Neural Repairen_HK
dc.subjectBalanceen_HK
dc.subjectFallsen_HK
dc.subjectMovement Specific Reinvestment Scaleen_HK
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_HK
dc.subjectStrokeen_HK
dc.titleReinvestment and falls in community-dwelling older adultsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1545-9683&volume=22&spage=410&epage=414&date=2008&atitle=Reinvestment+and+falls+in+community-dwelling+older+adults.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailAbernethy, AB: bruceab@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAbernethy, AB=rp00886en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1545968307313510en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18334603-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-45449090467en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros153076en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-45449090467&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage410en_HK
dc.identifier.epage414en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257145200011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WL=24385743500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMaxwell, JP=7201610565en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAbernethy, AB=8841578500en_HK

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