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Article: Can bioelectric impedance monitors be used to accurately estimate body fat in Chinese adults?

TitleCan bioelectric impedance monitors be used to accurately estimate body fat in Chinese adults?
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherH E C Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/
Citation
Asia Pacific Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2007, v. 16 n. 1, p. 66-73 How to Cite?
AbstractMany laboratory-based methods exist to estimate body fat, yet few can be rapidly and easily applied to field studies. Bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) has developed to include portable foot-to-foot systems that can estimate body fat during field studies, but it is unclear if the data they provide are comparable to anthropometric methods traditionally used in large epidemiological fieldwork. This study analysed the reliability and validity of three BIA devices (low, medium, and high cost), from duplicate measures of mass and percentage body fat (%BF) from 20 young Chinese. Comparisons were made to reference values of %BF derived from 38 duplicated anthropometric measurements and the mean of at least 7 regression equations. All three BIA devices were reliable, with intraclass correlation coefficients never below 0.999, whilst both technical errors of measurement and coeffi-cients of variation (expressed as percentages) were below 1%. Validity analysis revealed all three devices significantly overestimated %BF using the standard measurement setting (no correction for athletic status) compared to the reference method: UM-022 (+3.2%, p< 0.01), BF-350 (+2.6%, p< 0.01), and TBF-410 (+2.1%, p< 0.01). When %BF was corrected for athletic status, neither the BF-350 (+0.3%, p= 0.72), nor the TBF-410 (-0.2%, p= 0.86) produced a %BF that differed significantly from the reference method. It was concluded that these three BIA devices were reliable and could be recommended as valid field measures of mass and %BF in this sample population provided the device allows a correction for athletic status.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87864
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.35
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.672
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, DJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:35:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:35:28Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAsia Pacific Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2007, v. 16 n. 1, p. 66-73en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0964-7058en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87864-
dc.description.abstractMany laboratory-based methods exist to estimate body fat, yet few can be rapidly and easily applied to field studies. Bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) has developed to include portable foot-to-foot systems that can estimate body fat during field studies, but it is unclear if the data they provide are comparable to anthropometric methods traditionally used in large epidemiological fieldwork. This study analysed the reliability and validity of three BIA devices (low, medium, and high cost), from duplicate measures of mass and percentage body fat (%BF) from 20 young Chinese. Comparisons were made to reference values of %BF derived from 38 duplicated anthropometric measurements and the mean of at least 7 regression equations. All three BIA devices were reliable, with intraclass correlation coefficients never below 0.999, whilst both technical errors of measurement and coeffi-cients of variation (expressed as percentages) were below 1%. Validity analysis revealed all three devices significantly overestimated %BF using the standard measurement setting (no correction for athletic status) compared to the reference method: UM-022 (+3.2%, p< 0.01), BF-350 (+2.6%, p< 0.01), and TBF-410 (+2.1%, p< 0.01). When %BF was corrected for athletic status, neither the BF-350 (+0.3%, p= 0.72), nor the TBF-410 (-0.2%, p= 0.86) produced a %BF that differed significantly from the reference method. It was concluded that these three BIA devices were reliable and could be recommended as valid field measures of mass and %BF in this sample population provided the device allows a correction for athletic status.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherH E C Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutritionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdipose Tissue - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAnthropometry - instrumentation - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Composition - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCosts and Cost Analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshElectric Impedanceen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_HK
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshReproducibility of Resultsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and Specificityen_HK
dc.titleCan bioelectric impedance monitors be used to accurately estimate body fat in Chinese adults?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0964-7058&volume=16&spage=66&epage=73&date=2007&atitle=Can+bioelectric+impedance+monitors+be+used+to+accurately+estimate+body+fat+in+Chinese+adults?+en_HK
dc.identifier.emailMacfarlane, DJ: djmac@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMacfarlane, DJ=rp00934en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid17215182-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33847102804en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros155265en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros129212-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33847102804&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage66en_HK
dc.identifier.epage73en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245189000010-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacfarlane, DJ=7202978517en_HK

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