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Article: Achievement goal profiles, perceived ability and participation motivation for sport and physical activity
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TitleAchievement goal profiles, perceived ability and participation motivation for sport and physical activity
 
AuthorsSit, CHP1
Lindner, KJ
 
KeywordsChildren and youth
Cluster analysis
Culture
Hong Kong
Motives
Physical activity participation
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherEdizioni Luigi Pozzi srl. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijsp-online.com
 
CitationInternational Journal Of Sport Psychology, 2007, v. 38 n. 3, p. 283-303 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractBoys and girls of secondary school level aged 14 to 19 (N = 1214) who took part in sport and physical activity in addition to their compulsory physical education classes were asked to complete the Participation Motivation Inventory (PMI; Gill, Gross, & Huddleston, 1983), the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (TEOSQ; Duda & Nicholls, 1992), and the Perceived Physical Ability (PA) subscale of the Physical Self-Efficacy Scale (PSES; Ryckman, Robbins, Thornton, & Cantrell, 1982). Factor analysis with varimax rotation of the PMI items produced seven motive structures similar to those obtained by Gill et al. (1983). Multivariate and univariate ANOVA techniques produced significant sport motive differences among four goal profiles resulting from a cluster analysis (moderate task-moderate ego, high task-high ego, low task-high ego, and high task-low ego) in youths. The high taskhigh ego group in general subscribed to both the intrinsic- and extrinsic-typed sport motives more strongly than the other groups and exhibited the strongest motive strengths. Sport motive differences varied as a function of PA, gender and participation level. However, the relationship between goal profiles and sport motives was not moderated by PA, gender or participation level. We conclude that it is the combination of task and ego orientations, rather than the level of PA, that is important for the adoption of participation motives in youth.
 
ISSN0047-0767
2012 Impact Factor: 0.867
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.276
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorSit, CHP
 
dc.contributor.authorLindner, KJ
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:35:24Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:35:24Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractBoys and girls of secondary school level aged 14 to 19 (N = 1214) who took part in sport and physical activity in addition to their compulsory physical education classes were asked to complete the Participation Motivation Inventory (PMI; Gill, Gross, & Huddleston, 1983), the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (TEOSQ; Duda & Nicholls, 1992), and the Perceived Physical Ability (PA) subscale of the Physical Self-Efficacy Scale (PSES; Ryckman, Robbins, Thornton, & Cantrell, 1982). Factor analysis with varimax rotation of the PMI items produced seven motive structures similar to those obtained by Gill et al. (1983). Multivariate and univariate ANOVA techniques produced significant sport motive differences among four goal profiles resulting from a cluster analysis (moderate task-moderate ego, high task-high ego, low task-high ego, and high task-low ego) in youths. The high taskhigh ego group in general subscribed to both the intrinsic- and extrinsic-typed sport motives more strongly than the other groups and exhibited the strongest motive strengths. Sport motive differences varied as a function of PA, gender and participation level. However, the relationship between goal profiles and sport motives was not moderated by PA, gender or participation level. We conclude that it is the combination of task and ego orientations, rather than the level of PA, that is important for the adoption of participation motives in youth.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Sport Psychology, 2007, v. 38 n. 3, p. 283-303 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage303
 
dc.identifier.hkuros140564
 
dc.identifier.issn0047-0767
2012 Impact Factor: 0.867
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.276
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35648950678
 
dc.identifier.spage283
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87859
 
dc.identifier.volume38
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherEdizioni Luigi Pozzi srl. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijsp-online.com
 
dc.publisher.placeItaly
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Sport Psychology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectChildren and youth
 
dc.subjectCluster analysis
 
dc.subjectCulture
 
dc.subjectHong Kong
 
dc.subjectMotives
 
dc.subjectPhysical activity participation
 
dc.titleAchievement goal profiles, perceived ability and participation motivation for sport and physical activity
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong