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Article: Back injuries in competitive squash players

TitleBack injuries in competitive squash players
Authors
KeywordsAthletic injuries
Back injuries
Epidemiology
Squash racquets
Issue Date1998
PublisherEdizioni Minerva Medica.
Citation
Journal Of Sports Medicine And Physical Fitness, 1998, v. 38 n. 4, p. 337-343 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. The aim of this investigation was to examine the prevalence of back injuries in competitive squash players. Methods. Experimental design: a retrospective analysis was made using a cross-section of current competitive squash players (survivor population). Setting/participants: an attempt was made to distribute a questionnaire on back injuries to all competitive squash players registered in the Otago provincial area, New Zealand, (n=1047), of which 495 questionnaires were returned (47.3% compliance). Interventions: variables were cross-tabulated and analysed via descriptive statistics, paired t-tests, χ-analyses of trend and χ 2 tests of significance. Measures: the questionnaire obtained information on demographics, the level of play (ability), overall volume of play (average frequency and duration of all exposures), plus the occurrence and severity of back injury. Results. Nearly 52% of the sample reported they had suffered back injury. Of these, 33.5 % claimed squash initiated their injury, 20.6% claimed squash exacerbated a previous back injury and the remaining 45.9% felt that squash had no detrimental effect on their back injury. Significantly higher frequencies of back injury were observed in males (56.5% compared to 46.4% in females, p=0.033), in players of higher grade (p=0.006), and with increased frequency (p=0.01), but not duration of play (p=1.0). Conclusions. These results suggest that the greater activity and possible over-reaching for the ball associated with higher levels of play may increase the risk of back injury and provides tentative support for the notion that back injuries in squash players might be related to periods of relative over- use.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87857
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.111
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.455
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, DJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShanks, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:35:23Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:35:23Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Sports Medicine And Physical Fitness, 1998, v. 38 n. 4, p. 337-343en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-4707en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87857-
dc.description.abstractBackground. The aim of this investigation was to examine the prevalence of back injuries in competitive squash players. Methods. Experimental design: a retrospective analysis was made using a cross-section of current competitive squash players (survivor population). Setting/participants: an attempt was made to distribute a questionnaire on back injuries to all competitive squash players registered in the Otago provincial area, New Zealand, (n=1047), of which 495 questionnaires were returned (47.3% compliance). Interventions: variables were cross-tabulated and analysed via descriptive statistics, paired t-tests, χ-analyses of trend and χ 2 tests of significance. Measures: the questionnaire obtained information on demographics, the level of play (ability), overall volume of play (average frequency and duration of all exposures), plus the occurrence and severity of back injury. Results. Nearly 52% of the sample reported they had suffered back injury. Of these, 33.5 % claimed squash initiated their injury, 20.6% claimed squash exacerbated a previous back injury and the remaining 45.9% felt that squash had no detrimental effect on their back injury. Significantly higher frequencies of back injury were observed in males (56.5% compared to 46.4% in females, p=0.033), in players of higher grade (p=0.006), and with increased frequency (p=0.01), but not duration of play (p=1.0). Conclusions. These results suggest that the greater activity and possible over-reaching for the ball associated with higher levels of play may increase the risk of back injury and provides tentative support for the notion that back injuries in squash players might be related to periods of relative over- use.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherEdizioni Minerva Medica.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitnessen_HK
dc.subjectAthletic injuriesen_HK
dc.subjectBack injuriesen_HK
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectSquash racquetsen_HK
dc.titleBack injuries in competitive squash playersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-4707&volume=38&spage=337&epage=343&date=1998&atitle=Back+injuries+in+competitive+squash+playersen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMacfarlane, DJ: djmac@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMacfarlane, DJ=rp00934en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid9973778-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032414460en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros43221en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032414460&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage337en_HK
dc.identifier.epage343en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000077899300010-
dc.publisher.placeItalyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacfarlane, DJ=7202978517en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShanks, A=20135776700en_HK

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