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Article: Do expertise and the degree of perception-action coupling affect natural anticipatory performance?

TitleDo expertise and the degree of perception-action coupling affect natural anticipatory performance?
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherPion Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.com
Citation
Perception, 2003, v. 32 n. 9, p. 1127-1139 How to Cite?
AbstractTwo experiments using a temporal occlusion paradigm (the first with expert and novice participants and the second with participants of intermediate skill) were conducted to examine the capability of tennis players to predict the direction of an opponent's service in situ. In both experiments two different response conditions, reflecting differing degrees of perception-action coupling, were employed. In a coupled condition players were required to make a movement-based response identical to that which they would use to hit a return of service in a game situation, whereas in an uncoupled condition a verbal prediction of service direction was required. Experiment 1 provided clear evidence of superior prediction accuracy under the coupled response condition when ball flight was available, plus some limited evidence to suggest that superior prediction accuracy under uncoupled response conditions might hold true if only advance (pre-contact) information was available. Experiment 2 showed the former finding to be a robust one, but was unable to reveal any support for the latter. Experiment 1 also revealed that expert superiority is more apparent for predictions made under natural (coupled) than uncoupled response-mode conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that different perceptual processes may be in operation in anticipatory tasks which depend on skill level, the type of information presented, and degree of perception-action coupling inherent in the task requirements.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87840
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.518

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, ABen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:35:10Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:35:10Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPerception, 2003, v. 32 n. 9, p. 1127-1139en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0301-0066en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87840-
dc.description.abstractTwo experiments using a temporal occlusion paradigm (the first with expert and novice participants and the second with participants of intermediate skill) were conducted to examine the capability of tennis players to predict the direction of an opponent's service in situ. In both experiments two different response conditions, reflecting differing degrees of perception-action coupling, were employed. In a coupled condition players were required to make a movement-based response identical to that which they would use to hit a return of service in a game situation, whereas in an uncoupled condition a verbal prediction of service direction was required. Experiment 1 provided clear evidence of superior prediction accuracy under the coupled response condition when ball flight was available, plus some limited evidence to suggest that superior prediction accuracy under uncoupled response conditions might hold true if only advance (pre-contact) information was available. Experiment 2 showed the former finding to be a robust one, but was unable to reveal any support for the latter. Experiment 1 also revealed that expert superiority is more apparent for predictions made under natural (coupled) than uncoupled response-mode conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that different perceptual processes may be in operation in anticipatory tasks which depend on skill level, the type of information presented, and degree of perception-action coupling inherent in the task requirements.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPion Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPerceptionen_HK
dc.titleDo expertise and the degree of perception-action coupling affect natural anticipatory performance?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0301-0066&volume=32&spage=1127&epage=1139&date=2003&atitle=Do+expertise+and+the+degree+of+perception-action+coupling+affect+natural+anticipatory+performance?en_HK
dc.identifier.emailAbernethy, AB: bruceab@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAbernethy, AB=rp00886en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1068/p3323-
dc.identifier.pmid14651325-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0348209134-
dc.identifier.hkuros94292en_HK

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