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Article: Maximising the clinical use of exercise gaseous exchange testing in children with repaired cyanotic congenital heart defects: The development of an appropriate test strategy
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TitleMaximising the clinical use of exercise gaseous exchange testing in children with repaired cyanotic congenital heart defects: The development of an appropriate test strategy
 
AuthorsMcManus, A1
Leung, M1
 
Issue Date2000
 
PublisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://sportsmedicine.adisonline.com/pt/
 
CitationSports Medicine, 2000, v. 29 n. 4, p. 229-244 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractImplicit in deciding upon an exercise test strategy to elucidate cardiopulmonary function in children with congenital heart disease are appropriate application of gas exchange techniques and the significance of the data collected to the specific congenital heart disorder. Post-operative cardiopulmonary responses to exercise in cyanotic disorders are complex and, despite a large body of extant literature in paediatric patients, there has been much difficulty in achieving quality and consistency of data. Maximal oxygen uptake is widely recognised as the best single indicator of cardiopulmonary function and has therefore been the focus of most clinical exercise tests in children. Many children with various heart anomalies are able to exercise to maximum without adverse symptoms, and it is essential that test termination is based on the same criteria for these children. Choosing appropriate, valid indicators of maximum in children with congenital heart disease is beset by difficulties. Such maximal intensity exercise testing procedures have been challenged on the grounds that they do not give a good indication of cardiopulmonary function that is relevant to real life situations. Furthermore, they are prone to much inter-individual variability and error in the definition of maximal exertion. Alternative strategies have been proposed which focus upon dynamic submaximal and kinetic cardiopulmonary responses, which are thought to be less dependent on maximal voluntary effort and more suited to the daily activity patterns of children. These methods are also not without problems. Variability in anaerobic threshold measurements and controversy regarding its physiological meaning have been debated. It is recommended that an appropriate cardiopulmonary exercise gas exchange test strategy, which provides clinically useful information for children with cyanotic congenital heart disease, should include both maximal and submaximal data. The inclusion of oxygen uptake kinetics and ventilatory data are encouraged, since they may allow the distinction between a pulmonary, cardiovascular or inactivity related exercise limitation.
 
ISSN0112-1642
2013 Impact Factor: 5.320
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.771
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000086579000002
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, A
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, M
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:35:06Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:35:06Z
 
dc.date.issued2000
 
dc.description.abstractImplicit in deciding upon an exercise test strategy to elucidate cardiopulmonary function in children with congenital heart disease are appropriate application of gas exchange techniques and the significance of the data collected to the specific congenital heart disorder. Post-operative cardiopulmonary responses to exercise in cyanotic disorders are complex and, despite a large body of extant literature in paediatric patients, there has been much difficulty in achieving quality and consistency of data. Maximal oxygen uptake is widely recognised as the best single indicator of cardiopulmonary function and has therefore been the focus of most clinical exercise tests in children. Many children with various heart anomalies are able to exercise to maximum without adverse symptoms, and it is essential that test termination is based on the same criteria for these children. Choosing appropriate, valid indicators of maximum in children with congenital heart disease is beset by difficulties. Such maximal intensity exercise testing procedures have been challenged on the grounds that they do not give a good indication of cardiopulmonary function that is relevant to real life situations. Furthermore, they are prone to much inter-individual variability and error in the definition of maximal exertion. Alternative strategies have been proposed which focus upon dynamic submaximal and kinetic cardiopulmonary responses, which are thought to be less dependent on maximal voluntary effort and more suited to the daily activity patterns of children. These methods are also not without problems. Variability in anaerobic threshold measurements and controversy regarding its physiological meaning have been debated. It is recommended that an appropriate cardiopulmonary exercise gas exchange test strategy, which provides clinically useful information for children with cyanotic congenital heart disease, should include both maximal and submaximal data. The inclusion of oxygen uptake kinetics and ventilatory data are encouraged, since they may allow the distinction between a pulmonary, cardiovascular or inactivity related exercise limitation.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationSports Medicine, 2000, v. 29 n. 4, p. 229-244 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage244
 
dc.identifier.hkuros52781
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000086579000002
 
dc.identifier.issn0112-1642
2013 Impact Factor: 5.320
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.771
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid10783899
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033997388
 
dc.identifier.spage229
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87835
 
dc.identifier.volume29
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://sportsmedicine.adisonline.com/pt/
 
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealand
 
dc.relation.ispartofSports Medicine
 
dc.titleMaximising the clinical use of exercise gaseous exchange testing in children with repaired cyanotic congenital heart defects: The development of an appropriate test strategy
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong