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Article: Effects of artificially-induced anaemia on sudomotor and cutaneous blood flow responses to heat stress

TitleEffects of artificially-induced anaemia on sudomotor and cutaneous blood flow responses to heat stress
Authors
KeywordsAnaemia
Exercise
Heat stress
Skin blood flow
Sweating
Issue Date1997
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00421/index.htm
Citation
European Journal Of Applied Physiology And Occupational Physiology, 1997, v. 76 n. 4, p. 380-386 How to Cite?
AbstractThe influence of artificially induced anaemia on thermal strain was evaluated in trained males. Heat stress trials (38.6°C, water vapour pressure 2.74 kPa) performed at the same absolute work rates [20 min of seated rest, 20 min of cycling at 30% peak aerobic power (V̇O(2peak)), and 20 min cycling at 45% V̇O(2peak)] were completed before (HST1) and 3-5 days after 3 units of whole blood were withdrawn (HST2). Mild anaemia did not elevate thermal strain between trials, with auditory canal temperatures terminating at 38.5°C [(0.16), HST1] and 38.6°C [(0.13), HST2; P > 0.05]. Given that blood withdrawal reduced aerobic power by 16%, this observation deviates from the close association often observed between core temperature and relative exercise intensity. During HST2, the absolute and integrated forearm sweat rate (ṁ(SW) exceeded control levels during exercise(P < 0.05), while a suppression of forehead ṁ(SW) occurred (P < 0.05). These observations are consistent with a possible peripheral redistribution of sweat secretion. It was concluded that this level of artificially induced anaemia did not impact upon heat strain during a 60-min heat stress test.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87834
ISSN
1999 Impact Factor: 0.983
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, NASen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, MJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCotter, JDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, DJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:35:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:35:05Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Applied Physiology And Occupational Physiology, 1997, v. 76 n. 4, p. 380-386en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0301-5548en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87834-
dc.description.abstractThe influence of artificially induced anaemia on thermal strain was evaluated in trained males. Heat stress trials (38.6°C, water vapour pressure 2.74 kPa) performed at the same absolute work rates [20 min of seated rest, 20 min of cycling at 30% peak aerobic power (V̇O(2peak)), and 20 min cycling at 45% V̇O(2peak)] were completed before (HST1) and 3-5 days after 3 units of whole blood were withdrawn (HST2). Mild anaemia did not elevate thermal strain between trials, with auditory canal temperatures terminating at 38.5°C [(0.16), HST1] and 38.6°C [(0.13), HST2; P > 0.05]. Given that blood withdrawal reduced aerobic power by 16%, this observation deviates from the close association often observed between core temperature and relative exercise intensity. During HST2, the absolute and integrated forearm sweat rate (ṁ(SW) exceeded control levels during exercise(P < 0.05), while a suppression of forehead ṁ(SW) occurred (P < 0.05). These observations are consistent with a possible peripheral redistribution of sweat secretion. It was concluded that this level of artificially induced anaemia did not impact upon heat strain during a 60-min heat stress test.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00421/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiologyen_HK
dc.subjectAnaemiaen_HK
dc.subjectExerciseen_HK
dc.subjectHeat stressen_HK
dc.subjectSkin blood flowen_HK
dc.subjectSweatingen_HK
dc.titleEffects of artificially-induced anaemia on sudomotor and cutaneous blood flow responses to heat stressen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1439-6319&volume=76&spage=380&epage=386&date=1997&atitle=Effects+of+artificially-induced+anaemia+on+sudomotor+and+cutaneous+blood+flow+responses+to+heat+stressen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMacfarlane, DJ: djmac@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMacfarlane, DJ=rp00934en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s004210050265en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9349656-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030658063en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros33687en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030658063&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume76en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage380en_HK
dc.identifier.epage386en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997XY43000015-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaylor, NAS=7201546462en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPatterson, MJ=7402379237en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCotter, JD=7006104892en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacfarlane, DJ=7202978517en_HK

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