File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Suicide rates in China during a decade of rapid social changes

TitleSuicide rates in China during a decade of rapid social changes
Authors
KeywordsChina
Epidemiological studies
Men
Rural health
Suicide
Urban health
Women
Issue Date2005
PublisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127
Citation
Social Psychiatry And Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2005, v. 40 n. 10, p. 792-798 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: China accounts for more than 30% of the world's suicides and displays a unique pattern of suicide rates. Prior research had established the link between macrosocial changes and suicide. Comprehensive surveillance system of suicide in this rapidly developing country is much needed. This paper examined the trends of national-, region-, gender-, and age-specific suicide rates, and male to female ratios in suicide in China for the period of 1991-2000, which was a time that rapid economic and social changes took place. Methods: A regression model was used to detect any variations in national-, region-, gender-, and age-specific suicide rates and gender ratios reported by the most recent mortality statistics from China's Ministry of Health. Results: National, urban, and rural suicide rates for both men and women decreased significantly for the period of 1991-2000; age-specific suicide rates, however, showed that there were different patterns of changes in suicide rates in rural and urban areas. Although elderly suicide rates showed the most significant decrease in urban areas, younger women showed the largest decrease in rural areas; male to female gender ratio in suicide increased significantly in the urban areas, but no significant change was found in rural areas. Conclusions: Possible explanations that may account for the downward trends in suicide rates and increase in male to female gender ratio in urban area were provided. Longer historical studies are needed to reveal the relationship between macrosocial changes and the pattern of suicide. © Springer-Verlag 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87797
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.513
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.095
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHu, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSong, XMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:34:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:34:33Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSocial Psychiatry And Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2005, v. 40 n. 10, p. 792-798en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0933-7954en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87797-
dc.description.abstractBackground: China accounts for more than 30% of the world's suicides and displays a unique pattern of suicide rates. Prior research had established the link between macrosocial changes and suicide. Comprehensive surveillance system of suicide in this rapidly developing country is much needed. This paper examined the trends of national-, region-, gender-, and age-specific suicide rates, and male to female ratios in suicide in China for the period of 1991-2000, which was a time that rapid economic and social changes took place. Methods: A regression model was used to detect any variations in national-, region-, gender-, and age-specific suicide rates and gender ratios reported by the most recent mortality statistics from China's Ministry of Health. Results: National, urban, and rural suicide rates for both men and women decreased significantly for the period of 1991-2000; age-specific suicide rates, however, showed that there were different patterns of changes in suicide rates in rural and urban areas. Although elderly suicide rates showed the most significant decrease in urban areas, younger women showed the largest decrease in rural areas; male to female gender ratio in suicide increased significantly in the urban areas, but no significant change was found in rural areas. Conclusions: Possible explanations that may account for the downward trends in suicide rates and increase in male to female gender ratio in urban area were provided. Longer historical studies are needed to reveal the relationship between macrosocial changes and the pattern of suicide. © Springer-Verlag 2005.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127 en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectEpidemiological studiesen_HK
dc.subjectMenen_HK
dc.subjectRural healthen_HK
dc.subjectSuicideen_HK
dc.subjectUrban healthen_HK
dc.subjectWomenen_HK
dc.titleSuicide rates in China during a decade of rapid social changesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0933-7954&volume=40&issue=10&spage=792&epage=8&date=2005&atitle=Suicide+rates+in+China+during+a+decade+of+rapid+social+changes+en_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-005-0952-8en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16205852-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27744568072en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros110674en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-27744568072&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage792en_HK
dc.identifier.epage798en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232662400004-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PSF=7102503720en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, KY=12238938300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, J=9232364100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSong, XM=7402269257en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats