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Article: Do Men Have a Higher Case Fatality Rate of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome than Women Do?

TitleDo Men Have a Higher Case Fatality Rate of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome than Women Do?
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Epidemiology, 2004, v. 159 n. 3, p. 229-231 How to Cite?
AbstractSevere acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been reported in 30 countries and regions, with a cumulative total of 8,099 probable cases and 774 deaths as of July 31, 2003, according to the World Health Organization. In Hong Kong, People's Republic of China, 1,755 SARS cases and 299 deaths had occurred as of September 22, 2003. The authors analyzed data from the Department of Health, Hong Kong SAR. The data series includes details regarding sex, age, and chronic disease history. Using data from early March to September 22, 2003, the authors found that males had a significantly (p < 0.0001) higher case fatality rate than females did, 21.9% versus 13.2%; the relative risk was 1.66 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35, 2.05), and it was 1.62 (95% CI: 1.21, 2.16) after adjustment for age. Subgroup analysis was conducted by excluding health care workers (n = 386) from the analysis. The overall crude relative risk of mortality was 1.41 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.74), and the adjusted relative risk was 1. 48 (95% CI: 1.10, 2.00). Thus, among SARS patients, males may be more severely affected by the disease than females are. This finding could be related to a nonuniform case definition of SARS disease, a different treatment regimen, a past smoking history, work-environment factors, or gender-specific immune-defense factors, for instance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87643
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.036
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.047
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChong, DSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, WYYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:32:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:32:28Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Epidemiology, 2004, v. 159 n. 3, p. 229-231en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87643-
dc.description.abstractSevere acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been reported in 30 countries and regions, with a cumulative total of 8,099 probable cases and 774 deaths as of July 31, 2003, according to the World Health Organization. In Hong Kong, People's Republic of China, 1,755 SARS cases and 299 deaths had occurred as of September 22, 2003. The authors analyzed data from the Department of Health, Hong Kong SAR. The data series includes details regarding sex, age, and chronic disease history. Using data from early March to September 22, 2003, the authors found that males had a significantly (p < 0.0001) higher case fatality rate than females did, 21.9% versus 13.2%; the relative risk was 1.66 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35, 2.05), and it was 1.62 (95% CI: 1.21, 2.16) after adjustment for age. Subgroup analysis was conducted by excluding health care workers (n = 386) from the analysis. The overall crude relative risk of mortality was 1.41 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.74), and the adjusted relative risk was 1. 48 (95% CI: 1.10, 2.00). Thus, among SARS patients, males may be more severely affected by the disease than females are. This finding could be related to a nonuniform case definition of SARS disease, a different treatment regimen, a past smoking history, work-environment factors, or gender-specific immune-defense factors, for instance.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Epidemiology. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen_HK
dc.titleDo Men Have a Higher Case Fatality Rate of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome than Women Do?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0002-9262&volume=159 &issue=3&spage=229&epage=231&date=2004&atitle=Do+Men+Have+a+Higher+Case+Fatality+Rate+of+Severe+Acute+Respiratory+Syndrome+than+Women+Do?en_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwh056en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid14742282-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0942301318en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros86020en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0942301318&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume159en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage229en_HK
dc.identifier.epage231en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000188614900004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChong, DSY=7005265413en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, WYY=35603486100en_HK

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