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Article: Growth in early life and its relation to pubertal growth

TitleGrowth in early life and its relation to pubertal growth
Authors
KeywordsBody mass index
Childhood
Height
Infancy
Longitudinal study
Puberty
Issue Date2003
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
Citation
Epidemiology, 2003, v. 14 n. 1, p. 65-73 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. The timing and magnitude of pubertal growth in relation to fetal, infancy and childhood growth have not been explored. Methods. We used data from a longitudinal growth study of 3650 full-term healthy children who were born in Gothenburg, Sweden in 1973-1975. This analysis included 2738 children with height and weight measurements available both in early life and during adolescence. Results. We found that faster linear growth during infancy and childhood was associated with earlier peak height velocity during adolescence. In contrast, greater height and body mass index (BMI) at birth were associated with later peak height velocity in adolescence. Children with faster linear growth and greater BMI in infancy and childhood had less height gain between ages 8 and 18. However, greater height and BMI at birth were associated with more height gain between ages 8 and 18 after adjusting for height and BMI in childhood. Conclusions. Both length and BMI (at birth, in infancy and during childhood) are associated with the timing and magnitude of pubertal growth. Being small at birth is associated with early puberty and a reduced height gain during adolescence. Copyright © 2002 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87605
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.075
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.981
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, ZCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHe, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlbertssonWikland, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:32:00Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:32:00Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology, 2003, v. 14 n. 1, p. 65-73en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1044-3983en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87605-
dc.description.abstractBackground. The timing and magnitude of pubertal growth in relation to fetal, infancy and childhood growth have not been explored. Methods. We used data from a longitudinal growth study of 3650 full-term healthy children who were born in Gothenburg, Sweden in 1973-1975. This analysis included 2738 children with height and weight measurements available both in early life and during adolescence. Results. We found that faster linear growth during infancy and childhood was associated with earlier peak height velocity during adolescence. In contrast, greater height and body mass index (BMI) at birth were associated with later peak height velocity in adolescence. Children with faster linear growth and greater BMI in infancy and childhood had less height gain between ages 8 and 18. However, greater height and BMI at birth were associated with more height gain between ages 8 and 18 after adjusting for height and BMI in childhood. Conclusions. Both length and BMI (at birth, in infancy and during childhood) are associated with the timing and magnitude of pubertal growth. Being small at birth is associated with early puberty and a reduced height gain during adolescence. Copyright © 2002 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsEpidemiology. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.subjectBody mass indexen_HK
dc.subjectChildhooden_HK
dc.subjectHeighten_HK
dc.subjectInfancyen_HK
dc.subjectLongitudinal studyen_HK
dc.subjectPubertyen_HK
dc.titleGrowth in early life and its relation to pubertal growthen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1044-3983&volume=14&issue=1&spage=65&epage=73&date=2003&atitle=Growth+in+Early+Life+and+Its+Relation+to+Pubertal+Growthen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/00001648-200301000-00016en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0347386679en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros76178en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0347386679&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume14en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage65en_HK
dc.identifier.epage73en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuo, ZC=7401699005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, YB=7202111441en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, Q=36821495800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlbertssonWikland, K=19639814800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK

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