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Conference Paper: Secular trends in pubertal development

TitleSecular trends in pubertal development
Authors
KeywordsAge at PHV
Final height
Menarche
Puberty
Secular trends
Twins
Issue Date2002
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/HRE
Citation
Hormone Research, 2002, v. 57 SUPPL. 2, p. 19-30 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To describe the secular trend in pubertal development in relation to the secular trend in height. Methods: Literature review of cross-sectional, longitudinal and twin studies. Results: Globally, there is a secular trend in adolescent growth for an increased mean final height at adulthood. To a lesser extent, there is also a secular trend towards earlier puberty. However, it seems that the two trends are not strongly connected. The increase in average height over the generations can, to a large extent, be explained by an earlier onset of the growth hormone-dependent phase of growth in early life. The age when this growth 'spurt' occurs in childhood strongly correlates with final height, but is not related to the age at peak height velocity during puberty. There is a large variation in the timing of the onset of puberty; it is largely influenced genetically, as implied by studies in twins. The single environmental factor that stands out as most significant - possibly explaining as much as 25% of the variation in the timing of puberty - is simply nutritional status in childhood; overnutrition and obesity seem to trigger pubertal onset. However, recent studies have identified that both shortness and thinness at birth are also associated with earlier pubertal maturation - a reverse of their impact during childhood years. Conclusions: More longitudinal studies are needed to understand the short- and long-term consequences of secular changes in both final height and pubertal development before we know how important the trends are. Copyright © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87568
ISSN
2011 Impact Factor: 2.48
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:31:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:31:32Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHormone Research, 2002, v. 57 SUPPL. 2, p. 19-30en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0301-0163en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87568-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To describe the secular trend in pubertal development in relation to the secular trend in height. Methods: Literature review of cross-sectional, longitudinal and twin studies. Results: Globally, there is a secular trend in adolescent growth for an increased mean final height at adulthood. To a lesser extent, there is also a secular trend towards earlier puberty. However, it seems that the two trends are not strongly connected. The increase in average height over the generations can, to a large extent, be explained by an earlier onset of the growth hormone-dependent phase of growth in early life. The age when this growth 'spurt' occurs in childhood strongly correlates with final height, but is not related to the age at peak height velocity during puberty. There is a large variation in the timing of the onset of puberty; it is largely influenced genetically, as implied by studies in twins. The single environmental factor that stands out as most significant - possibly explaining as much as 25% of the variation in the timing of puberty - is simply nutritional status in childhood; overnutrition and obesity seem to trigger pubertal onset. However, recent studies have identified that both shortness and thinness at birth are also associated with earlier pubertal maturation - a reverse of their impact during childhood years. Conclusions: More longitudinal studies are needed to understand the short- and long-term consequences of secular changes in both final height and pubertal development before we know how important the trends are. Copyright © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/HREen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHormone Researchen_HK
dc.rightsHormone Research. Copyright © S Karger AG.en_HK
dc.subjectAge at PHVen_HK
dc.subjectFinal heighten_HK
dc.subjectMenarcheen_HK
dc.subjectPubertyen_HK
dc.subjectSecular trendsen_HK
dc.subjectTwinsen_HK
dc.titleSecular trends in pubertal developmenten_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0301-0163&volume=57&issue=suppl 2&spage=19&epage=30&date=2002&atitle=Secular+Trends+in+Pubertal+Developmenten_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid12065922-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036282540en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros67352en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036282540&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume57en_HK
dc.identifier.issueSUPPL. 2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage19en_HK
dc.identifier.epage30en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000176834200004-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK

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