File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Potential impact of hormonal male contraception: Cross-cultural implications for development of novel preparations

TitlePotential impact of hormonal male contraception: Cross-cultural implications for development of novel preparations
Authors
KeywordsAcceptability
Attitudes
Cultural setting
Knowledge
Male contraception
Issue Date2000
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://humrep.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Human Reproduction, 2000, v. 15 n. 3, p. 637-645 How to Cite?
AbstractThe prospect of a hormonal male contraceptive is no longer distant. Data on the potential impact of this improvement in contraceptive provision, however, is limited, particularly between different cultures. We have therefore carried out a multi-centre study to assess men's attitudes to proposed novel hormonal methods. Questionnaire-based structured interviews were administered to men in Edinburgh, Cape Town, Shanghai and Hong Kong. Approximately 450 men were interviewed in Edinburgh, Shanghai and Hong Kong, and a slightly larger group (n = 493) in Cape Town to give samples (n > 150) of black, coloured and white men. Knowledge of existing male and female methods of contraception was high in all centres and groups. The majority of men welcomed a new hormonal method of contraception, 44-83% stating that they would use a male contraceptive pill. Overall, a pill was more acceptable than an injectable form (most popularly given at 3-6 month intervals); long-acting implants were least so except in Shanghai. Familiarity with comparable female methods appeared to influence acceptability, for both oral and injectable methods. Hong Kong was the only centre where a male method (condom) was currently the most commonly used; men there appeared to rate the convenience of condoms highly while being least likely to think that they provided effective protection against pregnancy compared to other centres, and were least enthusiastic about novel male methods. The acceptability of potential male hormonal methods of contraception was high in some groups but showed wide variability, determining factors including cultural background and current contraceptive usage. These results suggest that the emerging emphasis that men should have greater involvement in family planning will be substantiated when appropriate contraceptive methods become available.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87469
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.621
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.271
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMartin, CWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, RAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, PCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVan Der Spuy, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmith, KBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGlasier, AFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEverington, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorBaird, DTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:30:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:30:03Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHuman Reproduction, 2000, v. 15 n. 3, p. 637-645en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0268-1161en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87469-
dc.description.abstractThe prospect of a hormonal male contraceptive is no longer distant. Data on the potential impact of this improvement in contraceptive provision, however, is limited, particularly between different cultures. We have therefore carried out a multi-centre study to assess men's attitudes to proposed novel hormonal methods. Questionnaire-based structured interviews were administered to men in Edinburgh, Cape Town, Shanghai and Hong Kong. Approximately 450 men were interviewed in Edinburgh, Shanghai and Hong Kong, and a slightly larger group (n = 493) in Cape Town to give samples (n > 150) of black, coloured and white men. Knowledge of existing male and female methods of contraception was high in all centres and groups. The majority of men welcomed a new hormonal method of contraception, 44-83% stating that they would use a male contraceptive pill. Overall, a pill was more acceptable than an injectable form (most popularly given at 3-6 month intervals); long-acting implants were least so except in Shanghai. Familiarity with comparable female methods appeared to influence acceptability, for both oral and injectable methods. Hong Kong was the only centre where a male method (condom) was currently the most commonly used; men there appeared to rate the convenience of condoms highly while being least likely to think that they provided effective protection against pregnancy compared to other centres, and were least enthusiastic about novel male methods. The acceptability of potential male hormonal methods of contraception was high in some groups but showed wide variability, determining factors including cultural background and current contraceptive usage. These results suggest that the emerging emphasis that men should have greater involvement in family planning will be substantiated when appropriate contraceptive methods become available.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://humrep.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Reproductionen_HK
dc.rightsHuman Reproduction. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectAcceptabilityen_HK
dc.subjectAttitudesen_HK
dc.subjectCultural settingen_HK
dc.subjectKnowledgeen_HK
dc.subjectMale contraceptionen_HK
dc.titlePotential impact of hormonal male contraception: Cross-cultural implications for development of novel preparationsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0268-1161&volume=15&issue=3&spage=637&epage=645&date=2000&atitle=Potential+impact+of+hormonal+male+contraception:+cross-cultural+implications+for+development+of+novel+preparationsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, PC:pcho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PC=rp00325en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid10686211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034011741en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros48873en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034011741&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume15en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage637en_HK
dc.identifier.epage645en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000085670900027-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMartin, CW=7405842668en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAnderson, RA=35408622600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, L=34869443100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, PC=7402211440en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Der Spuy, Z=35461457500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, KB=15737446400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGlasier, AF=35370179000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEverington, D=35406148300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaird, DT=35371609800en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats